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In terms of keeping the horn 'original' you'd want to keep the snap in pads. However, in terms of how well it will play, my understanding is that it wouldn't matter either way as long as the overhaul is well done (it may be that these techs didn't want to mess with the snap in spuds). So the most important thing is to be sure that whoever does the overhaul knows what they are doing.
 

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Okay, everyone is totally envious including yours truly. How could a person discover such an auction in advance, in order to chance such benefit?
 

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... both recomended that if I wanted it to be a 'player' to have the snap in spuds removed and fitted with regular pads.
Some techs don't like to bother with getting around the spuds/snaps. Find one that will. That such horns with their original spuds/snaps are not "player" material... well, that is complete nonsense.

Do not take your horn to either of these techs. What you have is a special and rare instrument, beneath both of them. Do not devalue such a horn.
 

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Ditto on finding another tech. I‘ve got (at least) three Buescher horns with all the snaps; none of them have more than a few actual snap-on pads installed and believe me they are players.
 

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If you find a tech that has the musicmedic buescher hole punch set, that would be a good indication that they regularly work on Bueschers and don't remove the spuds.
It's a really good sign but not a "must have" for the actual work, but it makes things easier and prettier.
 

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I'd like to get this horn overhauled and in good playing condition. I spoke to two repair techs about working on Buescher True Tones and both recomended that if I wanted it to be a 'player' to have the snap in spuds removed and fitted with regular pads. Since it is such a special horn I'm in two minds about whether to keep it original with the snap in pads or to do what the techs recomended??
You have found a once-in-a-lifetime instrument, and you know that. Keep it to the original, as you know. Find a tech who will worship every part of it as historically and aesthetically important.

You're in a position to question any technician's advice. FWIW, like you, I wouldn't alter it: every aspect of the horn once worked and can work again, just as it once was or close to it. You are a curator now.

It is a masterpiece, and you are its custodian, not its owner. Preserve it for the future.

I am speechless not only at the quality of your find, but also at the very high level of connoisseurship in the replies to your post. Those demonstrate the deep knowledge to be found on this website in general. Bravo to you and to this excellent company of admirers!
 

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Speaking of experts on this site, here's a quote from "saxoclese" in another thread that may, I hope, be useful to the question of your vintage snaps: "I have repadded several Bueschers with white roo pads keeping the snaps and have had no problems. The technique that works for me is to apply just enough shellac to cover the back of the pad not quite to the edge and avoiding the center hole and while it is still warm to press the shellac against my bench anvil to make it flat and even."

You could probably ask that member questions directly.
 

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This part may be important too, also from
saxoclese: "Next I heat the keycup off the instrument and install the pad giving it a 1/4 turn to evenly distribute the shellac. The key is then installed and the pad is leveled without the snap. After the shellac is cool I add the snap and make any further small adjustments as necessary. I like to use Curt Alterac's method of "dry fitting" without any shellac to get a feel for how much shellac to apply by the size of the gap in the back of the pad."
 

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I spoke to two repair techs about working on Buescher True Tones and both recomended that if I wanted it to be a 'player' to have the snap in spuds removed and fitted with regular pads.
NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!! Run, do not walk, RUN AWAY FROM THOSE IDIOTS!!

I don't know where you are, but if I couldn't find someone within driving distance I'd contact Matt Stohrer.
 

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I am not a tech, but I have had probably 6-8 Bueschers overhauled by techs who really knew Bueschers and techs whose work was more generic. The quote above from saxoclese is in keeping with my own opinion/experiences.

You do not have to use snap-in pads to keep the snap-in resonators. In the end, they are just resonators and I have had saxes with and without the snaps removed. There is no significant difference in how it plays in my experience, so removing them will not really do anything about making it "a player". My go-to setup has been modern/standard pads and keeping the snaps. Modern pads (glued in) allow for more choices and also a bit more tone hole clearance (if desired) without increasing the key heights.

If you elect to go with original style snap-in pads and no glue, as originally designed, that might make it less of a player in terms of pads shifting and developing leaks. I suspect that does not have to be the case, but it will probably be very difficult to find someone who knows what they are doing with the glue-less setup, and even then it may prove less reliable in the long term.
 

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For corn's sake don't let anyone grind out the spuds. Those are probably the same techs who would grind the fork Eb tonehole down to the body and soft solder a penny over it.

You can use ordinary pads with snap-ins, just punch the center hole a bit bigger with a $12.99 hole punch you can buy at any leather working shop.

Once you mutilate the instrument, it's done. Pads can be changed easily, if later you want a different kind (I'd just use a high quality pad with cardboard backing and shellac, myself).
 

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That engraving is spectacular. I have seen fawned over firearms engraving that would not come close to the quality exhibited on that sax. Anybody with that kind of talent could have made a fortune engraving high-end European double barrel shotguns.
 
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