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Hard rubber alto mouthpiece?

Thanks
 

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Lakey is the biggest sleeper on the planet. Bright as you want without screechiness. Not for a beginner. I have an old 8*3 HR Lakey that compares nicely to my very expensive handmade Sakshama metal Studio G. Tips are around 90-.095 on both.
 

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Lakey is the biggest sleeper on the planet. Bright as you want without screechiness. Not for a beginner. I have an old 8*3 HR Lakey that compares nicely to my very expensive handmade Sakshama metal Studio G. Tips are around 90-.095 on both.
Not a sleeper for old farts like me. Most lead alto players in North Texas were using the Lakey back in the 70s and 80s (most of them have since retired the Lakey for something more moderate; but back in the day, LOUD and BRIGHT was the way alto players played).

I never could figure out their bizarre numbering system.
 

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Not a sleeper for old farts like me. Most lead alto players in North Texas were using the Lakey back in the 70s and 80s (most of them have since retired the Lakey for something more moderate; but back in the day, LOUD and BRIGHT was the way alto players played).

I never could figure out their bizarre numbering system.
Yepper! I was playing a Claude Lakey 7*3 on my ‘65 Mk VI alto in the early ‘80s. Bright, for sure, but I have since learned to appreciate having more body to the sound as well.
 

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JJ,
My category 3 hr alto piece will be available for pre-orders in a couple weeks.
Its a screamer with lots of body and crazy altissimo.
Keep an eye out for that.
 

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How does one define "bright?" I have never played a Lakey mouthpiece that I considered to be BRIGHT. I have three soprano sax and three clarinet mouthpieces by Claude - none of which I'd describe as BRIGHT.

My adult daughter has played a Lakey on her alto sax for many years now and she still uses it in her modern big-band. When I played it years ago, it sure didn't strike me as being bright. I don't care for it - she loves it.

So, trying to normalize such descriptions just doesn't work among various players. Any brightness we may hear or feel when we play a piece doesn't necessarily transfer to the next player.

The LOUDEST hard-rubber alto piece I ever played was a Beechler Diamond Inlay - I've forgotten the number on it now. I'm sure there is someone out there who will disagree. DAVE
 

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Didn't like the sound, but a Lakey was the brightest I can remember playing.
 

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Lakey for sure. Widely used by lead players in NV. I mean come on, you have to compete with the screech trumpets... yes that's plural, on purpose!
 

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When you ask Hard Rubber are you just asking not-Metal? Or actually Hard Rubber? Some of the pieces mentioned are plastic, not that it is necessarily bad, but just something to keep in mind if you are looking for an actual HR piece.
 

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+1 on the Metalite, which is plastic, not hard rubber. The CE Winds Mainstream is a Vandoren blue Jumbo Java "homage" in resin, also not HR. While perhaps not as clear in the upper range and altissimo as your average Metalite, I'd say it has a bit more core and complexity in the lower stack.

My Jody Jazz Jet is so bright I can't play it; he also makes a Super Jet that is apparently so bright you gotta wear shades.
 

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Not a sleeper for old farts like me. Most lead alto players in North Texas were using the Lakey back in the 70s and 80s (most of them have since retired the Lakey for something more moderate; but back in the day, LOUD and BRIGHT was the way alto players played).

I never could figure out their bizarre numbering system.


Sometimes Lakeys get a bum rap I mean they don't have to be constantly played BRIGHT.. Didn't Paul Desmond play a Lakey ?

The tip size number system for easy reference is on the Lakey website, for instance on the classic tenor models my 7*3 is .113 ...my 9*3 is .121

I really like my 8*3 Lakey on Alto, just a great all-around mpc. I first got mine back around '81.....as I recall I was on a ship gig out in Hawaii playing tenor..I heard a cat with the most beautiful alto tone you could imagine, I had to ask what he was playing..well, I got back to LA and I got one, mine has been my workhorse for decades.. Over time I did find other alto mpcs I liked, couple yrs ago I bought a alto mpc from Sakshama that is insane, but when I need to dial it back a taste or join the section the old Lakey still delivers.
 

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I never knew about Desmond's Lakey. He played a MC Gregory I think at one point. I have a friend who plays a Lakey on alto and he sounds great.
 

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A lot of players try a Lakey without success then dismiss it as a POS. I think it is a mouthpiece that requires developed control. It can be a very expressive mpc.


**note** my opinions are based on the Lakey HR "Classic" mouthpiece, I have no knowledge of their other offerings.
I did try a prototype metal, given to me by Norbert Stachel, I tried to play it for 4 yrs..nope...:(
 

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Mouthpieces sound more similar when they are played softly. When you push them is when the higher partials appear in the tone to various degrees. When you have a lot of them, most players hear this as bright.
 
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