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Discussion Starter #1
I am putting this thread here instead of in "sheet music"because I think it will be helpful to some of us late blowers.Improvisation is probably the
most complex skill especially for us late folks.I can improvise somewhat but am always looking for that angel of information that is going to help me get better.Let me highly recommend ,"Constructing Melodic Jazz Improvisation "by Brian Kane.It is by far the clearest most comprhensive
book on the subject that I have used and the least threatning.I say that because many instructional books on improvising start with scales
and chords then heap on more scales and chords.The author here takes a all the basic skills and he goes slowly using the books C.D.for examples and playalongs.
Amazon has it and it is worth the money.
 

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Gee Gandalfe,I suddenly feel resposible for the $25.00.With the caveat
that all of us have special needs ,If you,like me,fall into sub intermediate
/intermediate catagory,I think you will really like it.
A lot of top notch players who write are not very good teachers.
I started buying Saxophone Journal.With each issue is a" Master Class"
with a C.D.and it is very interesting looking at the teaching style of each
musician writing that issue.Skip Spratt is always excellent and I was
very impressed by the clarity of writing by Bryan Kane and that is what led me to this book.I truly hope you enjoy and profit from it.
 

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lamar reeves said:
Let me highly recommend ,"Constructing Melodic Jazz Improvisation "by Brian Kane.It is by far the clearest most comprhensive
book on the subject that I have used and the least threatning.I say that because many instructional books on improvising start with scales
and chords then heap on more scales and chords.The author here takes a all the basic skills and he goes slowly using the books C.D.for examples and playalongs.
Hi Lamar,
Could you tell me a bit more about this book and your experience with it.
What distinguishes this from other books of its kind, like Jeff Hariington's
"Blues Improvisation Complete"? It appears from my cursory examination that
they have a very similar approach: first master a blues scale (say concert Bb)
and develop a library of riffs on that scale so that you can solo without so
much concern for the changes, and after that, start adding harmonic
information. Kane's book looks like it talks a bit more about melodic contours,
but the rough idea is the same.

This seems like a more promising approach than the typical chord/scale
approach.
 
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