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Hi all, I grabbed one of these horns back in the summer as a fixer-upper, which needed some corks and felts replacing, and a couple of minor low end leaks were in need of addressing. Well, I finally got round to doing it today. I'm seriously impressed!

There doesn't seem to be much info out there but maybe someone here would know was it a student, intermediate or 'pro' model in Jupiter's hierarchy?
When it comes to putting a date on it, I'm presuming as the S/N starts with a 6, it was made in 1987 and I did read somewhere that it was modelled on the Mk 7. This particular one is in really good shape with no damage and about 95%+ lacquer. I like it.

Note for note it's sounds bang on to my ears, and with a Berg metal piece on it, it screams. I think I'll keep it for a while to get reacquainted with tenor, but I'm trying to work out why these Jupiter horns get such a bad rap. I recently sold a Jupiter 767 alto for peanuts (I only paid peanuts for it) and that played seriously well too. What gives? Is it brand snobbery or are there more bad Jupiter horns out there than other brands??

Thanks
 

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I'm not too acquainted with the hierarchy of Jupiter's instruments, but I play on a Jupite baritone and soprano and I relly like them. Our member and pro Merlin plays Jupiter also (higher models) and is very happy with them.

People just like to bad mouth to make them feel better about spending 5 times more for a horn that is 1.5 times better at most, and generally not even that.
 

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I think the 787 is intermediate as far as the Jupiter line goes, but I had one and I agree 100% with your assessment. Check out their silver 800-series tenors...they are supposed to be really good and they frequently go for less than a grand. AFAIK Jupiter has been making quality instruments out of Taiwan for quite some time now...very well established.
 

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I have never played a sts-787, but have had a chance to play the current model intermediate alto, the JAS-1100, which belongs to a friend. I was very impressed with that horn. I played a Yamaha YAS-52 for quote awhile and this horn is definitely comparable.
 

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Hi all, I grabbed one of these horns back in the summer as a fixer-upper, which needed some corks and felts replacing, and a couple of minor low end leaks were in need of addressing. Well, I finally got round to doing it today. I'm seriously impressed!

There doesn't seem to be much info out there but maybe someone here would know was it a student, intermediate or 'pro' model in Jupiter's hierarchy?
When it comes to putting a date on it, I'm presuming as the S/N starts with a 6, it was made in 1987 and I did read somewhere that it was modelled on the Mk 7. This particular one is in really good shape with no damage and about 95%+ lacquer. I like it.

Note for note it's sounds bang on to my ears, and with a Berg metal piece on it, it screams. I think I'll keep it for a while to get reacquainted with tenor, but I'm trying to work out why these Jupiter horns get such a bad rap. I recently sold a Jupiter 767 alto for peanuts (I only paid peanuts for it) and that played seriously well too. What gives? Is it brand snobbery or are there more bad Jupiter horns out there than other brands??

Thanks
Jupiter has never really had a bad reputation. Their beginner 500-600 models and intermediate-level 700 horns were quickly generally accepted and recommended by music educators and school band leaders.

The only problem with them is they have no panache. Players think of them all as being what the manufacturer made its name with: beginner and intermediate-level instruments. That the 869-889 silver plated saxes with solid sterling silver necks are as good as any Cannonball or other Taiwan-made horn is lost on them. That's good news, not bad. Altos and tenors both sell for cheap.

Consider the pro model JTS-2089. Anyone who has played one knows it's on a par with a Yamaha YTS-62 III. Personally, I think it falls between that and a Selmer Serie III. But they're never going to sell used for over $1,200 in as-new condition. Only because the bell has Jupiter engraved on it, the player who would be shopping in a higher price range will not be seeking one out.
 

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The 500 series soprano I had was a great little horn.
Tuned beautifully and easily.
Seemed to be well made and sounded terrific.
If I ever decide to start playing soprano again, I will be on the look out for another 549 Jupiter model.
Especially if I can pick one up for the measly $300 Australian I paid for the other one.
 

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Actually, from a repairers point of view...it took Jupe about a decade to really hone their sax-making skills. I generally feel that the models which begin with prefix S, that'd be their earlier ones, can be quite variable compared to the later ones with model #'s starting with a J. The question regarding those was how well they hold up to regular playing. So I'd be interested if you chimed back in in around a year and gave us your impression on that. How much servicing it needed, how often, etc...

I am a fan of Jupes made after around 1999...I too feel they always get overlooked, almost NEVER considered by folks shopping for a low/mid budget used or new horn. Whenever someone inquires about the choice of horns I may have in their price range at the time, the Jupes almost ALWAYS get dismissed quickly.
Nice thing about these horns is their market values tend to stay very low, considering what you get for that $$.

I agree with above comment on the 8XX Artist series horns (sadly discontinued) - those are pretty darn good saxes which blow and sound great. MY only criticism of 'em was the gauge of the body metal. NOT all that different from many contemporary asian horns - but I would have liked to have seen something a tad more robust in that category, given they were marketed as their top-shelfers.

To the OP, your 787 was in its day their top offering I believe (the student offerings being the 5XX series, intermediates being the 6XX and 7XX series at the time, I believe, would have been their top shelfer).

The 5XX and 6XX series horns after '99 are well made, reliable. I would recommend those as much as any Yamaha 21 or 23. Their tone(s) IMHO, are so-so...but so is the tone of a 23. Not bad, but definitely of the modern, brighter paradigm with not much complexity, IMHO. A sound which suits a lotta folks, but doesn't suite me or many others, necessarily.
I think starting w/the 8XX Artist series Jupe actually started offering some models which, sonically, are more complex and nicer. I have never tried a 2089, but I can say the current top-shelf 1100 series horns are just very GOOD sounding saxes, and well-built. Yes, it meets the standards of a good, modern, pro horn.

Interestingly, I just got IN an STS 787...bought it as a project horn solely because its price was so absurdly low. So when I get done with refurbing I will give my impressions of it here.

Enjoy your horn !
 

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Jaye, your viewpoint and knowledge is always appreciated here.
 

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Question as to how well the OP's Jupiter will hold up is easily answered: it's a little over 30 years old. Already doesn't owe anybody anything.

I know a pro player who has played his used JAS-769-767 (yes, a long model number) for around 20 years with no repairs other than a couple of pad replacements. He bought it for a couple hundred bucks. I loan him "better" horns to try out just for fun once-in-awhile (Conn 6M, Selmer 162, Buescher TT, Cannonball VR, most recently). So far, no alto has impressed him enough to want to trade up. His tenor is a Selmer BA.

As to the gauge of brass used, I agree that the JTS-889 is built light. It was intended as a pro model to be played by someone who is not likely to be rough on it, and who may appreciate less weight on the neck and shoulders. Conversely though, the top-end JTS-2089 is built like a tank; it's heavier than my SX90R and Serie II; no explanation for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Wow, it’s nice to see so many positive and knowledgeable replies. Thanks all. I’ve dabbled with a few tenors in my time, and this horn certainly doesn’t feel overshadowed by any of them. Ok, my Selmer Series 2 was a great horn, but I’m really quite taken with how well this Jupiter plays. Weight wise, it’s very light, but that’s a good thing to me. Physically, aesthetically and mechanically it appears sound. Certainly not a 30+ year old junker. It’s also nice and quiet now I’ve given it a lick of key oil. It’s the most fun I’ve had for such little money.
 

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Question as to how well the OP's Jupiter will hold up is easily answered: it's a little over 30 years old. Already doesn't owe anybody anything.

I know a pro player who has played his used JAS-769-767 (yes, a long model number) for around 20 years with no repairs other than a couple of pad replacements. He bought it for a couple hundred bucks. I loan him "better" horns to try out just for fun once-in-awhile (Conn 6M, Selmer 162, Buescher TT, Cannonball VR, most recently). So far, no alto has impressed him enough to want to trade up. His tenor is a Selmer BA.

As to the gauge of brass used, I agree that the JTS-889 is built light. It was intended as a pro model to be played by someone who is not likely to be rough on it, and who may appreciate less weight on the neck and shoulders. Conversely though, the top-end JTS-2089 is built like a tank; it's heavier than my SX90R and Serie II; no explanation for that.
Interesting. I'd like to get my hands on a 2089 some day.

Just a note - the longevity/regulation issues I was referring to were in reference to the earlier horns, those with the S prefix. STS, SAS, etc. Which is why I asked OP to report back in a year if possible. The horns you note are the later J prefix ones - of which I agree with you; nothing about those come up short in my book.
 

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Wow, it’s nice to see so many positive and knowledgeable replies. Thanks all. I’ve dabbled with a few tenors in my time, and this horn certainly doesn’t feel overshadowed by any of them. Ok, my Selmer Series 2 was a great horn, but I’m really quite taken with how well this Jupiter plays. Weight wise, it’s very light, but that’s a good thing to me. Physically, aesthetically and mechanically it appears sound. Certainly not a 30+ year old junker. It’s also nice and quiet now I’ve given it a lick of key oil. It’s the most fun I’ve had for such little money.
Very good !
 
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