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It's possible material may make a teeny difference, but not because of any acoustic properties, merely that different metals may react differently to the way its is formed., e.g. when tone holes are extruded the geometry of the "corner" where the tone hole chimney comes out of the body could have a slight different angle/curve . This is a small difference but it only needs a small difference at such places in the body to affect the sound.

One other possibility is the roughness of the finish on the inside, but most metals would have a more or less identically smooth finish.

So these tiny differences in bore geometry may make a difference, but not the acoustic properties, or "resonance" of the metal as you would get with instruments such as drums or guitars.

Did your friend explain why the material wouldn't make a difference? I'm asking that because people who think it does, seem to think it is because of the vibration or some kind of resonance (as with drums or guitars), yet these factors as far as I can tell are nothing to do with klangbogens which claim some other kind of theory.
It seems that many of the snake oil salesmen want us to believe their Klangbogen or dense metal lyre screw affects and enhances air flow inside the instrument. The reality is there is very little air flow in a woodwind instrument. The air is essentially sitting there inside the instrument and the molecules that make up the air are set to vibrating by the reed. When you blow into a sax or any other woodwind you don't really blow much air. It's just enough to make the reed vibrate and probably not enough to make a strip of paper, or a feather, move if laid across the end of a sax, clarinet, flute or bassoon. I'm sure if you used sensitive enough instruments you could measure the volume of air moving through the instrument over a given period of time but the flowing air is not what is making sound. It's the vibrating air molecules knocking up against each other, transmitting energy from one to the next, and causing a wave to spread out like ripples on the surface of a pond.
 

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And yet that molecular energy in the bore also makes the instrument vibrate in your hands. The vibration of the brass may not have any acoustic impact, assuming Coltman or other acousticians are right, but it's easy to understand why some players feel that it does. It actually seems to me a reasonable, if inaccurate, assumption.

I wonder how many players who scoff at resonance as an unscientific notion still insist that the sax vibrates in their soul.
 

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And yet that molecular energy in the bore also makes the instrument vibrate in your hands. The vibration of the brass may not have any acoustic impact, assuming Coltman or other acousticians are right, but it's easy to understand why some players feel that it does. It actually seems to me a reasonable, if inaccurate, assumption.
Sure, many inaccurate assumptions are reasonable at first glance. To a child, or an adult in a naive culture, it's reasonable to assume that the Sun flies around the Earth. But once our understanding has moved past that point, there's no reason to continue to handle the outmoded assumption with kid gloves.
 

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And yet that molecular energy in the bore also makes the instrument vibrate in your hands.
The only time I've ever felt a saxophone actually vibrate, is a Martin Comm III, but the reason was a side Bb keycup not sprung properly. Once it was fixed, back to no more vibrating saxophone.
 

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And yet that molecular energy in the bore also makes the instrument vibrate in your hands. The vibration of the brass may not have any acoustic impact, assuming Coltman or other acousticians are right, but it's easy to understand why some players feel that it does. It actually seems to me a reasonable, if inaccurate, assumption.

I wonder how many players who scoff at resonance as an unscientific notion still insist that the sax vibrates in their soul.
Do scoffers have souls?
 

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Plastic Saxophones sound exactly like wood Saxophones and wood Saxophones sounds exactly like brass Saxophones and brass Saxophones sound exactly like sterling silver Saxophones.

Saxophones sound the same no matter what it is made out of, that is why beginners always play plastic Saxophones.
 

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Plastic Saxophones sound exactly like wood Saxophones and wood Saxophones sounds exactly like brass Saxophones and brass Saxophones sound exactly like sterling silver Saxophones.

Saxophones sound the same no matter what it is made out of, that is why beginners always play plastic Saxophones.
I like silver because it sounds shiny.
 

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The only time I've ever felt a saxophone actually vibrate, is a Martin Comm III, but the reason was a side Bb keycup not sprung properly. Once it was fixed, back to no more vibrating saxophone.
Really? Huh. My Zephyr alto definitely vibrates, though not my Comm III. But whether or not such vibrations are due to adjustment issues, I can still understand why a logical person might assume that a vibrating horn resonates. That they don't is actually kind of counter-intuitive.
 

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Saxophones vibrate more based on how expensive it is. Plastic vibrates the least because it is the cheapest. Solid gold would vibrate the most because it is most expensive. But if a person pays the solid gold price for a plastic sax, it will vibrate equal to a solid gold sax.

Nothing else about an instrument’s material effects the sound. Anything you think you hear is simply brain freeze from eating too much ice cream as a child.

Just like in that vibrato sax video, plastic sounds exactly the same brass. Any differences heard are audio such as microphone placement or different reeds. It doesn’t matter if plastic *always* sounds a certain way. In those cases, the microphone was placed the exact same way every single time. Yes indeed, different players in different studios all place the microphone the same way for plastic Saxophones! That is the *only* difference since we know for a fact that material doesn’t effect sound at all
 

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I'm of the opinion that material does make a difference beyond small differences incurred in manufacturing but the difference may be perceived by the player more than by the audience. IOW, if a Sterling silver neck makes it easier for a player to do what he wants, he perceives that he sounds better, so he plays better. If it were possible to have a brass neck exactly the same as the silver neck the artist might or might not be able to tell them apart by playing but almost certainly nobody else could. You can't verify perceptions with science but the artist will insist on certain things once he experiences them. There is certainly a non-scientific element to choices in musical instruments that is based for the most part on perception, but who can argue if it has a positive effect on performance?
I think some people may experience actual differences, but their perception has nothing to do with measured acoustics and everything to do with the player's thoughts and feelings. It would be too simplistic to say it "the only difference is in your head", but the only thing that has a profound effect on the sound of a saxophone is the player.

That being said, the way you interact with your horn can be profoundly effected by how you think and feel about it, and that can definitely effect your playing. We've all had experiences of being 'on' and being 'off'. If we think our horn is lacking in some way it can effect our confidence, which can effect our playing to varying degrees, but effects our own perception of our playing MUCH more. I know from listening to recordings of myself when I thought I was playing awesome (at the time) and comparing them to times I thought I was sucking (at the time) that the differences listening back later are tiny -if they're there at all- compared to what I thought at the time. Like a listener, at the time, couldn't have told the difference. Perception is huge. But that doesn't mean it has no importance whatsoever.
 

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The only time I've ever felt a saxophone actually vibrate, is a Martin Comm III, but the reason was a side Bb keycup not sprung properly. Once it was fixed, back to no more vibrating saxophone.
I can certainly feel the passive vibration of the saxophone, but again, passive vibrations occur everywhere (we vibrate too in presence of sound waves I doubt that these vibrations produce any sound) and if they are too small to be significant they don't contribute te the sound of anything.

Anyway, even if there were vibrations whith minute sound contributions they would be dampened by at least 3 ( hands and mouth) if not 4 ( clothes ) in the body of the player.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sympathetic_resonance

In stringed instruments ( and pianos too) the sympathetic vibrations MAY play a role in sound production (they work in a different way than saxophones)
 

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Plastic Saxophones sound exactly like wood Saxophones and wood Saxophones sounds exactly like brass Saxophones and brass Saxophones sound exactly like sterling silver Saxophones.
A very good point, and although there is a lot of truth in that, it needs qualifying. I don't believe you can generalise like that because to sound exactly the same they would need the exact same internal bore, keyhole geometry and placement.

Saxophones sound the same no matter what it is made out of, that is why beginners always play plastic Saxophones.
I certainly started out on a plastic saxophone (Grafton), although it's crazy to say all beginners do. But at times I still do play the plastic Grafton and it sounds very similar to my Buescher 500 TH & C. Obviously they knew back then that using plastic (acrylic) as a material for a professional instrument would not cause it to sound different to brass or other metals.
 

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I can certainly feel the passive vibration of the saxophone, but again, passive vibrations occur everywhere (we vibrate too in presence of sound waves I doubt that these vibrations produce any sound) and if they are too small to be significant they don't contribute te the sound of anything.

Anyway, even if there were vibrations whith minute sound contributions they would be dampened by at least 3 ( hands and mouth) if not 4 ( clothes ) in the body of the player.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sympathetic_resonance

In stringed instruments ( and pianos too) the sympathetic vibrations MAY play a role in sound production (they work in a different way than saxophones)
Sympathetic vibrations occur when the size, shape, and mass of an object gives it the same "resonant" frequency as the sound wave that sets it into vibration. A good example is the snare drum at the back of the orchestra that buzzes when one or both of the heads have same resonant frequency as note(s) sounded by the other instruments. This is why the snare is released whenever the snare drum isn't being played.

That said, the "natural resonant frequency" of the body of a saxophone seldom matches pitches of the majority of notes being played, plus the brass is not readily set into vibration by the sound waves in the air column inside. It is interesting to note that scientific tests have shown that the vibrations of the walls and bell of a trombone are transfered from the vibrations of the mouthpiece rather than the vibrations in the air column.** Whether this implies that the vibrations of the body of a saxophone come mostly from the vibrations of the mouthpiece remains to be answered. If that is the case then it would be logical to assume that the cork barrier separating the mouthpiece from the brass of the neck would have a dampening effect upon those vibrations.

**
An Investigation Into Wall Vibrations - Whitehouse
 
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