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Hi guys. I think some explanation is in order. I'm doing this because of the recent thread concerning this horn.

I purchased the GH Huller tenor saxophone with Nazi fluting. I payed far less for it than what it was listed for.

I purchased it because of its historical value, not its value as a vintage instrument. I enjoy learning about WW2 and this has peaked my interest in the music scene during that era. Again, I did not purchase it because of its original intent, which was to spread the agenda of nazi hatred.

I received the horn yesterday and I must say it is in great condition. No dents, no broken or bent braces etc... Pads aren't great, springs need replaced, some leaks. Pretty much everything you would expect.

I am now trying to decide what I want to do with it. It's not the horn's fault it was used for hate. It just produced music. It did not physically hurt someone or cause harm to any member of the ally armed forces. I think it is just as far to think that the guy that played it was actually just a german musician needing a job. A member of a military band during that time was most likely more focused on his skills, not his possible beliefs.

I may end up restoring it and playing it for awhile. From the little I played it yesterday it has very good potential.

I hope this helps explain the reasons a person would purchase and preserve the history behind this saxophone.

Jason

Also, it came with a m.c. Gregory los angeles mouthpiece, which I thought was interesting as well.
 

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You are very brave to come on the forum and admit that you have purchased this horn, and say you intend to treat it as a 2nd hand Yamaha. Which it is not. IMO. The only suitable place for this horn is in a museum.
 

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Which will be stated in my will. Selling this horn for profit is not preserving the history. Therefore when I'm in the ground, it will be in a museum.
 

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That sounds like a great idea, but I hope it's a long time before your in the ground.
 

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I think that writing about it, you are doing the right thing.
Knowledge might prevent us from doing the same errors.
 

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I think bad juju would surround that horn and I wouldn't want it in my house
 

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Hi guys. I think some explanation is in order. I'm doing this because of the recent thread concerning this horn.

I purchased the GH Huller tenor saxophone with Nazi fluting. I payed far less for it than what it was listed for.

I purchased it because of its historical value, not its value as a vintage instrument. I enjoy learning about WW2 and this has peaked my interest in the music scene during that era. Again, I did not purchase it because of its original intent, which was to spread the agenda of nazi hatred.

I received the horn yesterday and I must say it is in great condition. No dents, no broken or bent braces etc... Pads aren't great, springs need replaced, some leaks. Pretty much everything you would expect.

I am now trying to decide what I want to do with it. It's not the horn's fault it was used for hate. It just produced music. It did not physically hurt someone or cause harm to any member of the ally armed forces. I think it is just as far to think that the guy that played it was actually just a german musician needing a job. A member of a military band during that time was most likely more focused on his skills, not his possible beliefs.

I may end up restoring it and playing it for awhile. From the little I played it yesterday it has very good potential.

I hope this helps explain the reasons a person would purchase and preserve the history behind this saxophone.

Jason

Also, it came with a m.c. Gregory los angeles mouthpiece, which I thought was interesting as well.
I agree with the point you make about the German musician who probably played this horn. Musicians do what musician do. It reminds me of the scene from spielbergs film. Schindlers List.
The German soldiers are clearing the Warsaw Ghetto, to take everyone to the camps, and amid the carnage, a young German soldier sees a piano in one of the apartments and proceeds to play Bach.
 

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Not a reflection on you but I would be utterly embarrassed to have this type of paraphernalia in my possession
I spent too many of my younger years and have too many scars from fighting with neo Nazi skinheads or Bone heads as we like to call them through my involvement in the local Ska Reggae scene.
Not trying to judge you, but if somebody brought an object like that into my house, they would be playin the blues each time they farted from then on.
 

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Keep the horn,destroy the engraving. Making history is greater than fetishizing it. When neo-nazi's realize their misguided ways they have their tatoos removed or altered. I don't think it's wrong for you to have the horn. I have no problem with you're keeping the horn. It exists as does our history. I just think you have a creative option that would be very positive.
 

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Keep the horn,destroy the engraving. Making history is greater than fetishizing it. When neo-nazi's realize their misguided ways they have their tatoos removed or altered. I don't think it's wrong for you to have the horn. I have no problem with you're keeping the horn. It exists as does our history. I just think you have a creative option that would be very positive.
The swastika has an extensive history. It was used at least 5,000 years before Adolf Hitler designed the Nazi flag. The word swastika comes from the Sanskrit svastika, which means "good fortune" or "well-being." The motif (a hooked cross) appears to have first been used in Neolithic Eurasia, perhaps representing the movement of the sun through the sky. To this day it is a sacred symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Odinism. It is a common sight on temples or houses in India or Indonesia. Swastikas also have an ancient history in Europe, appearing on artifacts from pre-Christian European cultures.
The symbol experienced a resurgence in the late nineteenth century, following extensive archeological work such as that of the famous archeologist Heinrich Schliemann. Schliemann discovered the hooked cross on the site of ancient Troy. He connected it with similar shapes found on pottery in Germany and speculated that it was a "significant religious symbol of our remote ancestors."
In the beginning of the twentieth century the swastika was widely used in Europe. It had numerous meanings, the most common being a symbol of good luck and auspiciousness. However, the work of Schliemann soon was taken up by völkisch movements, for whom the swastika was a symbol of "Aryan identity" and German nationalist pride
This conjecture of Aryan cultural descent of the German people is likely one of the main reasons why the Nazi party formally adopted the swastika or Hakenkreuz (Ger., hooked cross) as its symbol in 1920.
The Nazi party, however, was not the only party to use the swastika in Germany. After World War I, a number of far-right nationalist movements adopted the swastika. As a symbol, it became associated with the idea of a racially "pure" state. By the time the Nazis gained control of Germany, the connotations of the swastika had forever changed.
In Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler wrote: "I myself, meanwhile, after innumerable attempts, had laid down a final form; a flag with a red background, a white disk, and a black swastika in the middle. After long trials I also found a definite proportion between the size of the flag and the size of the white disk, as well as the shape and thickness of the swastika."
The swastika would become the most recognizable icon of Nazi propaganda, appearing on the flag referred to by Hitler in Mein Kampf as well as on election posters, arm bands, medallions, and badges for military and other organizations. A potent symbol intended to elicit pride among Aryans, the swastika also struck terror into Jews and others deemed enemies of Nazi Germany.
Despite its origins, the swastika has become so widely associated with Nazi Germany that contemporary uses frequently incite controversy.
 
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The swastika has an extensive history. It was used at least 5,000 years before Adolf Hitler designed the Nazi flag. The word swastika comes from the Sanskrit svastika, which means "good fortune" or "well-being." The motif (a hooked cross) appears to have first been used in Neolithic Eurasia, perhaps representing the movement of the sun through the sky. To this day it is a sacred symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Odinism. It is a common sight on temples or houses in India or Indonesia. Swastikas also have an ancient history in Europe, appearing on artifacts from pre-Christian European cultures.
The symbol experienced a resurgence in the late nineteenth century, following extensive archeological work such as that of the famous archeologist Heinrich Schliemann. Schliemann discovered the hooked cross on the site of ancient Troy. He connected it with similar shapes found on pottery in Germany and speculated that it was a "significant religious symbol of our remote ancestors."
In the beginning of the twentieth century the swastika was widely used in Europe. It had numerous meanings, the most common being a symbol of good luck and auspiciousness. However, the work of Schliemann soon was taken up by völkisch movements, for whom the swastika was a symbol of "Aryan identity" and German nationalist pride
This conjecture of Aryan cultural descent of the German people is likely one of the main reasons why the Nazi party formally adopted the swastika or Hakenkreuz (Ger., hooked cross) as its symbol in 1920.
The Nazi party, however, was not the only party to use the swastika in Germany. After World War I, a number of far-right nationalist movements adopted the swastika. As a symbol, it became associated with the idea of a racially "pure" state. By the time the Nazis gained control of Germany, the connotations of the swastika had forever changed.
In Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler wrote: "I myself, meanwhile, after innumerable attempts, had laid down a final form; a flag with a red background, a white disk, and a black swastika in the middle. After long trials I also found a definite proportion between the size of the flag and the size of the white disk, as well as the shape and thickness of the swastika."
The swastika would become the most recognizable icon of Nazi propaganda, appearing on the flag referred to by Hitler in Mein Kampf as well as on election posters, arm bands, medallions, and badges for military and other organizations. A potent symbol intended to elicit pride among Aryans, the swastika also struck terror into Jews and others deemed enemies of Nazi Germany.
Despite its origins, the swastika has become so widely associated with Nazi Germany that contemporary uses frequently incite controversy.
You forgot to cite your source: http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007453
 

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That took some balls.
No matter what people think, preserving our history, good and bad, is necessary. We need these reminders of what our world was like.
As you said, the horn did nothing 'wrong' and is blameless for the beliefs of it's former owner.
 
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Its just a relic not flesh and blood. The horn did nothing to anybody. It may or may not have been tool for the Nazi regime but in the end people kill people not saxophones.
 

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I'm an not at all in favor of destroying historical artifacts. Keep it, it is a teaching device and it is clearly in responsible hands. My father, an 87 year old Jewish WW II veteran agrees with me on this.
 

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Interesting piece of history. You should donate it it to a museum. Just tel them that it is worth 5 grand and write it off.
I play at this place sometimes and they have these tiles on the floor in a room they use for private functions on the top floor. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Repertory_Theatre#History
It seems odd to me that they have left them there.
 

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Slap a decal over the engraving.
That way an historical document is preserved and folks do not get upset over the disturbing image.
No need to be superstitious about the poor old horn.
It didn't do nothing wrong.
Play it and get it happy working for the good guys.
 

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Interesting piece of history. You should donate it it to a museum. Just tel them that it is worth 5 grand and write it off.
I play at this place sometimes and they have these tiles on the floor in a room they use for private functions on the top floor. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Repertory_Theatre#History
It seems odd to me that they have left them there.
Long before the Nazi's used this symbol it was a decorative symbol used by some Native American tribe(s). I remember hearing this in a documentary some years ago. I will do some checking to see if this is in fact true and report back.
 
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