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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering.........If you use a Rovner, do you use it the traditional way, with the bars against the reed, or do you invert it, and have the bars on the body of the mpc? Have you tried it both ways?
I have been using mine with the bars on the reed, but today I decided to rotate it, and seems to play even more flawlessly. One thing for sure, it's virtually impossible to over-tighten it, in a way that will adversely affect the reed, with the bars off the reed.
 

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I play with the screw on top (most common way). I have experimented with different configurations (screw down, screw up, screw sideways) and found that the most stable is screw on top. Stability is what I look for. But I agree that there is a difference in response when put different ways.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Bars on the reed only with the Rovner star, I believe the other ones are supposed to have the screw on the top.

The rule of thumb with legs is that they are made for right handed people, if the screw is on the right out of the box that is the way they are meant to be.

I remember speaking to the rep about this, the star is different because the bars are exposed metal, all the others the fabric is around the bars so this goes on the opposite side to the reed. They either have small holes in the fabric or a cutaway so you can see the reed.

(Sounds like you've been doing it wrong!)
 

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They were designed for the screw on top. This way the resilience of the fabric ensures even pressure all over the reed, reducing the chance of a poor seal.

Just FYI I have been using Rovner ligatures as my preferred ligature (though not my only) since 1978. I'm not sure when they were introduced but it couldn't have been much before that. There was only one model in those days.
 

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It is quite easy to reverse a Rovner so its still tapered correctly and the nut is on the LH side, whether you like the screw on top or bottom. I do this anyway on the tenor so the ligs don't get tangled up when I play duals. I am an old hand at reversing ligatures. :) But to the question, I like the Star Series with the screw on top like all the other Rovners I have used, and I have been using them on all horns for over twenty years. I'd say in this case the 'factory rep' is full of bull.
Speaking of the SS, that ligature made a huge difference from the Rovner I was using before, and I thought that one was good. The SS was more clear/penetrating without being 'edgy'. I switched back and forth with the same reed several times and there was no doubt it was the ligature making the difference.
The forum is rather divided on the question of whether a ligature can make a difference and Phil Barone is in the 'no' camp. Everybody has their opinion but I have no doubt in the matter. I use different Rovners on different horns/set-ups to adjust my sound for those set-ups. To me its always been plain as day - you play with a regular lig and then you switch to a Rovner and your sound will most likely be different in one way or another. That's proof and easy to repeat, which is scientific proof.
It might take some time to find the ligature that works for you. The ones who won't try anything else might never know what they are missing.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I’m a big fan of Rovner’s simplest design, without frills, plates etc. I think they call it ‘Star’ model these days. Been using them for a couple decades. Always in the traditional position, bars on top.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone. I'm not looking for a new ligature, I was just wondering who's doing what, with their Rovners.
I started out with a Rovner Versa X, and later switched to a Dark, which I really like. The Versa X was too much of a pain to line up the "bed" with the reed.
I believe if you look at the Rovner instruction sheet that comes with each ligature, they show the bars on the reed as being the suggested orientation, but I do agree that the reversed orientation seem to be the better application. There is no "right or wrong" way to use it.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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T
I believe if you look at the Rovner instruction sheet that comes with each ligature, they show the bars on the reed as being the suggested orientation, but I do agree that the reversed orientation seem to be the better application.
View attachment 243552
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There's two ways to read that caption. "recommended postion, inverted," says to me, this is the inversion of the recommended position.
 

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There is no "right or wrong" way to use it.
True, but one way is better than the other. Using it as designed spreads the force across the reed more evenly and directs the force more perpendicular to the reed so most is used for holding the reed against the mouthpiece rather than squeezing the reed laterally. A ligataure's job, whether it's a Rovner or a shoelace, is to hold the reed as tightly as possible against the mouthpiece, ideally with equal force across the contacting surface.
 

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There's two ways to read that caption. "recommended postion, inverted," says to me, this is the inversion of the recommended position.
There's really only one way to read it for people who are familiar with traditional woodwind terminology. For many decades, ordinary metal clarinet and sax ligatures were customarily placed with the screws over the reed. They were designed to fit best that way. When players flipped them over and placed the screws on top of the mouthpiece, the position was called "inverted." And then ligatures specifically designed to have their screw(s) on top became known as "inverted ligatures."

Thus, "inverted" as applied to a ligature has a definite meaning: screw(s) on top. It does not merely mean upside-down.
 

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Rovner's (except the "Star") are meant to be put on the mouthpiece "inverted", meaning the screw on top and to the right. That's how the manufacturer designed them. You can put 'em on sideways if you want but again, screw on top and tightened with the right hand.....period. Don't know what else we all can tell you.
 

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There's two ways to read that caption. "recommended postion, inverted," says to me, this is the inversion of the recommended position.
I read it the other way around. First it states recommended position, followed by "inverted". The quotes means that this is a name for the recommended position. So I think that it means recommended position, and the name of the recommended position happens to be inverted, which refers to the screw being on top instead of over the reed like on a typical 2 screw design.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
There's really only one way to read it for people who are familiar with traditional woodwind terminology. For many decades, ordinary metal clarinet and sax ligatures were customarily placed with the screws over the reed. They were designed to fit best that way. When players flipped them over and placed the screws on top of the mouthpiece, the position was called "inverted." And then ligatures specifically designed to have their screw(s) on top became known as "inverted ligatures."

Thus, "inverted" as applied to a ligature has a definite meaning: screw(s) on top. It does not merely mean upside-down.
Thanks LC. That explains why the "inverted" appears in the caption. It made no sense, if you don't know that fact.
I agree, Dave. It seems to be much less prone to note irregularities, in the recommended position, though it seems darker.
 

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I play the Rovner Dark with the screws on the top and love it. Much easier to use that the old ligature I had been using and it did not break the bank.
 

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I have a Rovner VERSA with my Philtone Eclipse on my tenor sax and I use it with the screw on top. I am happy with the way I can Play with it.
 

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I use my Rovner Star on an Otto Link STM and STM NY with the bars on the reed. With the ridge on top of the STMs this is the easiest and quickest manner in which to secure the reed to the table and it does just fine. I have tried bars on top on both mpcs and didn't really hear any difference for me, YMMV...

For any other mouthpiece I seriously doubt I would flip the lig over out of the box. Bars on top would be just fine...
 
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