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hello
i have a really good friend are play on many mouthpiece on his saxophones and when i ask him why he change every show his setup he told thats because he belive you need to change for every style your mouthpiece . for example :Ottolink STM are good for Bebop ; ballads but Berglarsen good for Lester yound and coleman hawckins sound and labayle are good for funky music thats true ?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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You can learn to get a wide range of sounds/styles out of any single mouthpiece. Many players can use Otto Links for everything from classical to rock. Switching for every style will mean you never learn to develop the skill of shaping your sound, regardless of the mouthpiece.

That said, I personally like to have a "jazz" piece and a "rock/blues" piece for tenor and baritone. I could probably stretch one piece to cover both sounds, but I find I'm working too hard. So, for how I play, I enjoy a couple of pieces, used depending what gig it is.

Many people will tell you they've been playing the same single piece for every style/context for years. You can too. Or you can switch around a bit. Neither will hurt you. BUT, switching around too much will inhibit your learning on how to adjust the sound with embouchure/air/etc.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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thats true ?
No, not for most people I know of.

It's better to practise a lot so that you can get the sound you want or need.

BTW, is your friend a great player? Are there any soundclips?
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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One jazz and one classical is all I need.
Yeah, same with me. They way I see it, If I can get two mouthpieces, one on each extreme of the dark-bright spectrum, I can get pretty much any sound I want with a little work.
 

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In theory you shouldn't have to. Most players spend a lifetime working to achieve 'the sound' they want, and if they have to resort to using more than one mouthpiece to do so it could be argued that neither is really giving them what they want.
That's the theory.

In practice though there are often 'cultural' expectations which will force the player to conform. I use Dukoff D8s for all my professional playing...but then I don't do any classical performing, and I can well imagine the raised eyebrows were I to turn up for a recital with one of these beasts fitted to the horn.
In years gone by I used to use a Selmer F metal for big band and concert band work, and a Lawton 6*RBB for the blues gigs - and thought nothing of it until I noticed that other players who worked in both genres were using a single piece.
It soon became clear that there's more than one way to blow a particular piece, and that it takes time and practice to eke out that kind of versatility.

I can still see the advantages of using different pieces for the extremes (say from hard funk to classical), but changing a piece to play bepop and ballads? I think that's probably an example of taking things to another kind of extreme.

I should say that I use two pieces on a regular basis - one for gigging and one for testing horns on the workbench...but in that instance the workbench pieces are regarded as tools and are selected for very specific reasons that have very little to do with tone.

Regards,
 

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I use two similar but different mouthpieces on alto. A S-80 D or a Super Session D. Just enough differences for different rooms. On Soprano I have a Yamaha 3C, 4C and 5C to match up to different reeds.
 

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One horn, one mouthpiece.
If I can't get the 'sound' I'm looking for with that, it's off for some 'quality time' in the shed.
Style is an attitude. You don't need a crap load of gear to adjust an attitude.
 

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One horn, one mouthpiece.
If I can't get the 'sound' I'm looking for with that, it's off for some 'quality time' in the shed.
Style is an attitude. You don't need a crap load of gear to adjust an attitude.
+1. I agree totally BM, and you said it in a quite a few less words than I was going to use.
 

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One horn, one mouthpiece.
If I can't get the 'sound' I'm looking for with that, it's off for some 'quality time' in the shed.
Style is an attitude. You don't need a crap load of gear to adjust an attitude.
Personally I feel the more I'm geared up, the more bad A i look :p.

As for saxophone, I agree with Bandmommy 1 horn 1 mouthpiece. If it can't do it on that mouthpiece, it better find a way to overcome and adapt
 

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I have enough to do to learn the nuances of a single mouthpiece...
Or, as Woody Allen put it: "Raised by two mothers...wow, most of us barely survive one."
 

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The only time I swap is if I'm playing tenor in some hard-core classical setting (like, with a symphonic orchestra). Otherwise, I use the same setups for everything.
 

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hello
i have a really good friend are play on many mouthpiece on his saxophones and when i ask him why he change every show his setup he told thats because he belive you need to change for every style your mouthpiece . for example :Ottolink STM are good for Bebop ; ballads but Berglarsen good for Lester yound and coleman hawckins sound and labayle are good for funky music thats true ?
No it is not, you can play everything with just one mouthpiece.
Bye,

Stan
 

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Keep him as a "really good friend" but stop listening to him about anything related to saxophones!
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I used to switch mouthpieces on my 10M for jazz and rock, but realized down the road that my jazz mouthpiece was much better suited for my 10M than the rock mouthpiece I'd been using. Also, my favored rock mouthpiece was better suited for my Silversonic, so each of my tenors now has its own mouthpiece. Although I may favor my Silversonic for rock and my 10M for jazz, I'm now happy using either one for either application.
 

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Yes, I agree with Grumps: the only reason to use more than one mouthpiece is if you have different saxophones. It's not the type of music that makes the difference; it's the instrument.
 

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I like to use one mouthpiece for "legit" and one for everything else. I think I could get by using one mouthpiece (perhaps a change of reed...). However, I do find it easier to blend my tone with others when using my JJHR and I use my Beechler to project my tone in a more "individual" style. I could use the Beechler for both but it is just easier for me to use two.
 

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IMO, Stephen has pretty much nailed it down: More precisely, I have favourites that are my go-to pieces on every type of sax, but some of them have a distinctive sound that is not appreciated by all of my directors/band leaders. I had to get a Selmer S80 C** for alto for a couple of concerts with one orchestra and a S90/200 for baritone for the wind orchestra I play with regularily - not because I didn't get the sound I wanted from the pieces I had, but because the sound didn't fit the occasion or desired sound (in other words, it didn't blend). If this is desirable or not is a different matter - but if I was in the position of the director, I might come to the same conclusion. I also have to agree that my previous mouthpieces weren't ideal, especially not when a quiet passage had to be played - some characteristics stand out, no matter how soft one plays.

It's also a fact that some horns sound better with certain mouthpieces - the Jupiter tends to sound a bit too soft and dark with my favourite alto piece (Brancher L23), but works very well with a Selmer Soloist F - incidently, I can't stand that piece on my SA80II because it's much too nasal. Two horns, two matches. My Yamana alto sounds best with my Otto Link STM 7, but works reasonably well with the Brancher, too - yet on the SA80II, the STM induces serious tuning issues I don't have with any other mouthpiece (at least not to that extend). The best alround mouthpiece for alto appears to be the ARB Great Neck - it's comes in second best on all of my altos; so one line of thought would be to switch solely to the ARB and develop that - but why ditch the Brancher that sounds just fabulous with the SA80II I play most of the time? I could tell similar stories for baritone. For now, matching one horn and one mouthpiece makes the most sense to me (though on tenor and soprano, I seem to have found the "one and only" for each - but how long will it last?).

Sometimes my own preferences and needs have shifted in the past - maybe because of some gigs I was able to play with people that were after a different sound or played with a special setup (Rock'n'Roll doesn't sound like jazz standards, and what works well in a wind quartet may not work with a guitar band). Or maybe I simply wanted a change: On baritone, I thought I had found heaven with my Brancher L27, but lately I've found it a little too bright, somewhat lacking in warmth. Only recently I found a new favourite with the PPT (after having a serious affair with two Rico Metalites - most bang for the bug I've ever acquired, despite the PPT). But I can tell you right now that I'll not be welcome to play the PPT with the wind orchestra, as good as it may be. It's too distinctive, too colourful, if you will... So I'll be stuck with at least two pieces on baritone for the foreseeable future...

M.
 
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