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Discussion Starter #1
FIND ANOTHER PRIVATE LESSON TEACHER.
When you go to a lesson you should always have a little "stage fright" feeling. Even if you are well prepared your teacher should always give you the feeling that he or she will still demand for more--- that is how you improve. You want a DEMANDING TASK-MASTER. A friend -type relationship can greatly inhibit a highly productive student-teacher encounter--your "expensive" lesson;)
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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I think "fear" is maybe putting it too strong. The other thing is that different people respond to different motivations. There are actually some people and certainly some children who need the psychological space to know they can screw up without worrying about it. There are others who need a regular kick up the ****, of course.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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The only teacher I fear is the one who can't teach me a thing. You should come to respect more and more your teacher as you grow with him/her.
 

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This is absolutely true. The best private teacher I ever had was a holy terror, a working pro that expected you to pull off the impossible and all by ear. If you brought sheet music he'd take it and throw it on the floor. I could never rest for one second when I was around him, my mind had to stay focused at all times or he'd rip me a new one. No matter how many hours I spent practicing every day it was never enough until one day he told me "you're ready to start gigging" and I looked kind of shocked as he'd never been encouraging even once for over year. One thing is for sure his students that stuck it out all got results.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Meaner the better-- only if you are serious about playing
Otherwise have fun and be bad
If you just want a friend you can save money by buying lots of cheap beer and tipping the bartender well-- then they B your bosom buddy-- as long as ya keep them tips acoming
 

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Me and my private lesson teacher get along pretty well. We talk for a bit of the lesson about saxophone or music related items. Then we get to work.
For stage fright, I really don't get that. It happens occasionally if I feel alot of pressure. but I never feel pressure when I preform. I just play, and enjoy it.
 

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Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
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Man....I must of missed out. Every teacher I've had has been cool, laid back and understanding while still being focused, intelligent and motivational. I try to be the same for my students. i think if a guy was disrespectful to me I'd tell him to get lost and leave. If you need that kind of motivation to get results from yourself I think you might have some other issues.......... and so might the teacher. Whatever works though.......:)
 

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Frank, I used to study with Larry Slezak. The first jazz instruction I ever had came from him and he helped me start my CD collection. I don't think I was ever intimidated (except by his playing). I think I wanted to do well in my lessons more out of respect than out of fear.
 

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Nefertiti said:
I don't link demanding and mean together as necessarily similar attributes. Sorry I missunderstood you. I think I prefer demanding and nice.
The general mode of teaching -- in the area of the arts generally -- has evolved over the past 25 years or so from a master/apprentice relationship (in the hierarchical sense) to a professional teacher/student relationship. Though it's dangerous to generalize, students used to be abused more in the past, and I don't mean so much physically as mentally: denigrated, mocked, used as gophers and servants generally (in painting, students were often expected to "finish" the work of the master) or just ignored. The general tendency now is to treat the student with more respect, and more clinically (i.e. more impersonally): neither as a friend nor as an inferior but as a client. In my area -- writing -- writers found their way into the teaching game relatively recently, and many of the very best writers were notoriously awful teachers. They often scared the hell out of their students -- an approach that might be good for a few, but was destructive for most. This approach has mostly vanished as writers have figured out the teaching game. I don't know to what extent any of this applies to the realm of private music lessons, but it might be a useful point of comparison.

I should add that some aspects of the master/apprentice relationship will always remain in the arts (unlike, say, mathematics, in which subject one can learn as much, up to a point, from a teaching assistant as from a Nobel laureate), but that relationship, at least in some of the arts, has been modified. Part of this process is due to the mechanisms of universities, which insist on such measures of accountability as teaching evaluations, etc. Some of the changes have occured because if you're surrounded by students in a modern university environment on a daily basis, life is just more pleasant if you treat them reasonably well.
 

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Agent27 said:
Frank, I used to study with Larry Slezak. The first jazz instruction I ever had came from him and he helped me start my CD collection. I don't think I was ever intimidated (except by his playing). I think I wanted to do well in my lessons more out of respect than out of fear.
Now I haven't heard Larry's name in a dog's age. I played lots of jobs with him in my Houston days. Greta guy and player.
 

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HOUSTON NONET said:
FIND ANOTHER PRIVATE LESSON TEACHER.
Bulldroppings.

Play because you want to play. Practice because you want to get better. Go to a teacher for help getting there. If you're apprehensive before a lesson because you really want to show your teacher how much you've improved, fine. But do it all out of a love of music, not fear of teacher.

Oh, sure, if you're forcing your unmotivated 5th grader kid into music lessons, maybe the overbearing type will be more effective (or maybe he's drive the kid away from music permanently). And I'll allow that maybe even some adults learn well in that atmosphere, although as Nefertiti pointed out, they probably have "issues" (and probably should re-evaluate their reasons for wanting to play). But most people learn best in a more relaxed environment. "Fear of teacher" can prevent the student from asking questions (not wanting to look stupid) or taking risks (not wanting to fail). A good teacher (as opposed to merely a good player) will recognize what motivates each student, and adjust his style accordingly.
 

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HOUSTON NONET said:
No BS here
Not talking about 5th grader-- talking about young serious players-- not hobbiest.
Hobby, hobbier, hobbiest: the three degrees of hobbits.:D
 

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Real life and the demands of the "job market" will force you to be motivated to develop skills. Why pay for an extra helping of pressure. Unless you see it as rehearsal, preparing you for the the demands of the high end of the music business. A good teacher can adjust the demands according to the aspirations of the student.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Agent27 said:
Frank, I used to study with Larry Slezak. The first jazz instruction I ever had came from him and he helped me start my CD collection. I don't think I was ever intimidated (except by his playing). I think I wanted to do well in my lessons more out of respect than out of fear.
Tha's great Larry is a GREAT player.

My own experince is opposite
Only really studied with 3 sax teachers-- Hal Tennyson, Jim Riggs and John Giardano (prof at NTSU prior to Riggs) Closer I got to Hal less I felt like I learned. I am not talking about "fear" they will holler at you but being up to perform what they want and expect of you. The great flautist with the Houston Symphony for 30 years and great teacher Byron Hester also gave me that "upness" before a lesson. Well --each has their own way of learning But I stand on my humble opinion. Like taking tests if you wanna make an A better be up for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Pgraves said:
Real life and the demands of the "job market" will force you to be motivated to develop skills. Why pay for an extra helping of pressure. Unless you see it as rehearsal, preparing you for the the demands of the high end of the music business. A good teacher can adjust the demands according to the aspirations of the student.
now that is intelligent and valuable feedback
 
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