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Two years ago, I became the lucky owner of a recently overhauled Bundy Baritone Sax. The instrument had belonged to a community band and was in the basement of their building during a major flood; they decided to have it fixed up and sold (for a mere $900!!!!). It's truly a beautiful horn.

Only recently have I become aware of the Bundy\Buescher stenciling, and after doing some research (mainly on SOTW), I believe it is most likely a stencil of a Buescher 400. It bears a strong resemblance, both in construction and tone color...but if anybody could confirm or deny this (once I post pictures), that'd be great.

Mainly, I am looking to find mouthpieces that better suit the instrument. My current arsenal is a (modern) Like Super Tonemaster 7*, Rico Metalite M9, and Selmer S80 C*. The Selmer piece really doesn't go very well with this horn, being a French mouthpiece on a German horn - the tone color isn't very desirable, intonation is all over the place, and it just plays very "thin." The Link and Metalite pieces work better - the intonation isn't perfect, but the tone is more full and they feel more comfortable. I've recently been learning about the precedence for large chamber\deep baffle mouthpieces on Buescher horns (a la Adolph Sax's original models), which would explain why the Link (medium\large-ish chamber) and Metalite (very steep baffle) get by on my horn, but the Selmer doesn't cut it.

So, I'm looking for recommendations for mouthpieces that would go well on my Bundy. For classical, I'm thinking a Rascher (or possibly Caravan). In terms of jazz, I've had more trouble finding large chamber mouthpieces... I know of the Morgan Vintage, Jody Jazz DV NY, Theo Wanne Durga, and Saxgourmet Low Rider; I believe I've heard of Berg Larsen and Meyer making large chamber pieces, but haven't been able to find them. Or should I consider having my Link modified? Ideally, I like to have three pieces per sax - one each for classical, jazz (darker sound), and rock\fusion\peeling paint.
 

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I've been very happy with the Vandoren V-16 B7 on my 1932 Buescher True-Tone. Intonation is manageable and flexible, projection is good, but I can also blend really well with my bandmates when needed.

dv
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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If it's the Bundy from the 60's through 80's (back bell keys), then it really shouldn't matter what you put on it for a mouthpiece. It should generally play in tune. You don't need a large chamber piece on this horn, but they do work. Don't know what issues you're having with a C*, other that it is very closed, but mouthpiece selection must always be an agreement between the horn, the player, the reed, the mouthpiece, and what you're intending to sound like. As an example, I will have no trouble playing a C* on that horn, but you might. Your mouth and everything else is shaped differently from me, and your embouchure is more than likely different as well.

BTW, a Buescher instrument isn't German. It's American. Designed, manufactured, and assembled in Elkhart, Indiana, USA. Also, By the time this horn was designed, medium and smaller chamber pieces were normal.

A good all-around mouthpiece is the Link Tone Edge (hard rubber), but depending on what you want to do with the instrument the Rascher or Caravan pieces will work nicely as well. If Rock and Roll is your thing, pick up something with a high baffle instead, but ultimately you need to be trying pieces that work both for you and the horn, and what works for you may not work for someone else. It's personal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've been very happy with the Vandoren V-16 B7 on my 1932 Buescher True-Tone. Intonation is manageable and flexible, projection is good, but I can also blend really well with my bandmates when needed.

dv
A friend of mine plays a V16 B9, and I'll be trying it in the next few days. I've heard they're all-around excellent mouthpieces, so I'm excited to see how it plays.
 

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BTW, a Buescher instrument isn't German. It's American. Designed, manufactured, and assembled in Elkhart, Indiana, USA. Also, By the time this horn was designed, medium and smaller chamber pieces were normal.
Let me clarify what I meant by "German horn." In terms of classical saxophone (and I am currently studying more classical than jazz), I was under the impression that there are "French" style horns (Selmer, Buffet, Yamaha, etc) and "German" style (Buescher, Conn). Hence my interest in playing a Rascher or Caravan ("German" style) mouthpiece on the horn.
I fully realize that Bueschers are American-made. My mistake on the wording, but please correct me if I'm mistaken on this.
 

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.......I was under the impression that there are "French" style horns (Selmer, Buffet, Yamaha, etc) and "German" style (Buescher, Conn).
Nope, no such thing. Saxophones can have different bores, but that has nothing to do with the horn being French or German style.
 

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Let me clarify what I meant by "German horn." In terms of classical saxophone (and I am currently studying more classical than jazz), I was under the impression that there are "French" style horns (Selmer, Buffet, Yamaha, etc) and "German" style (Buescher, Conn). Hence my interest in playing a Rascher or Caravan ("German" style) mouthpiece on the horn.
I fully realize that Bueschers are American-made. My mistake on the wording, but please correct me if I'm mistaken on this.
This is probably a better description of what saxophones happen to be favored by different classical sax "schools" rather than a technically meaningful description of different kinds of saxophones.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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This is probably a better description of what saxophones happen to be favored by different classical sax "schools" rather than a technically meaningful description of different kinds of saxophones.
This is what I was thinking too. That said, we sometimes talk about these in terms of the sound of American horns vs. French vs. German vs. Asian, etc.
 

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Nope, no such thing. Saxophones can have different bores, but that has nothing to do with the horn being French or German style.
It makes sense if OP is clarinet player. There is a big difference in bore/MPC design btw boehm (french) and oehler (german) clarinet in MPC and bore design

with intonation being all over the place it's probably due to rebuild or small leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Nope, no such thing. Saxophones can have different bores, but that has nothing to do with the horn being French or German style.
The bore sizes are precisely what I'm referring to here. Whether or not they are the same as on Adolph Sax's original instruments. I have been under the impression that Buescher maintained these same dimensions, which are preferred by German style classical players.
 

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Anyways, any thoughts on the comparison of my Bundy to a Buescher 400? It seems to be a pretty close match to my eye. And if it is in fact a stencil of a Buescher 400, are there any particular mouthpieces that would work best?
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Not a stencil. This is a mid to late 60's Selmer Bundy low Bb bari, which is exactly the same instrument as the Buescher 400 bari of the day but with cheaper key work. Selmer USA owned both companies and used this same design on the Selmer Signet baris as well.

As I noted earlier, the question isn't about what mouthpiece works with the horn, but rather what you want the mouthpiece to help you do. Nearly any bari mouthpiece will perform adequately with this instrument.
 

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The bore sizes are precisely what I'm referring to here. Whether or not they are the same as on Adolph Sax's original instruments. I have been under the impression that Buescher maintained these same dimensions, which are preferred by German style classical players.
There is circumstantial evidence that Gus Buescher may have based the design of his company's first alto saxophones from an early original Adolph Sax alto he obtained in Europe. He visited Europe while he was working for the C.G. Conn Company and brought the Sax instrument back with him. Apparently Conn wasn't interested in using the horn as a template for its horns. Later, when Buescher started his own Company, he may have used the Sax instrument as a template. Much later, the Buescher Company presented Sigurd Rascher with the Adolph Sax alto. This story comes by way of Curt Altarac of Music Medic, and was told to him by Rascher's daughter. There's a post about it somewhere on the Musicmedic website.

From at least the late '20s / early '30s on, part of the Buescher company's marketing strategy was to associate itself with Sax by implying that the company was both carrying on in his tradition, and improving on the instrument he created.

Anyways, any thoughts on the comparison of my Bundy to a Buescher 400? It seems to be a pretty close match to my eye. And if it is in fact a stencil of a Buescher 400, are there any particular mouthpieces that would work best?
I don't play Bari, but I'll offer this: Until sometime in the early or mid-1950s, Buescher mouthpieces always featured medium to large chambers and relatively narrow tip openings. In the '50s Buescher's stock mouthpiece changed to a white plastic mouthpiece featuring straight walls and a horseshoe chamber, much like a Brilhart Ebolin or Tonalin mouthpiece. However, apparently they never offered a Baritone mouthpiece in this style. If you bought a Buescher baritone, it came with a black hard rubber mouthpiece with a large round chamber. However, I don't know how long that lasted. The "400" baritones didn't appear until the 1960s. I have no idea what those horns shipped with, but I bet a mouthpiece with a medium or large round chamber would work.

Also, Buescher's alto and tenor instruments seem to be pretty mouthpiece - friendly, so maybe that's true of the baritones, too.
 
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