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Silver prices don't really effect the prices much. I would say a Haynes standard model needing pads, etc. should run about $700-800. For $1,600 it should have no scratches or dings, new correct pads and corks and a flawless Haynes leather case. Also the heads on these older flutes are not up to the new ones so you may want to switch heads. Nothing wrong with the old flutes but they need to be bought right.
 

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Thanks for the comments. I'm in the process of investigating the asking prices of comparable models from other sources.

Just curious about the condition of your instruments when you purchased them -- i.e., was there an additional cost for COA, repadding, or overhaul? And I'm wondering to what extent the price of silver might affect pricing. Although Ag has recently "crashed", dropping 35% since the end of April, it is still 4x what it was only 2.5 years ago...

KM
Bear in mind too that the prices I paid were in $AUD when the dollar was down between .70-.80 USD.

The '41 needed an overhaul, the '61 only a tweak.
The '41 actually got sat on :(( and written off and I eventually sold the '61 in favor of my Uebel.

The '
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Bear in mind too that the prices I paid were in $AUD when the dollar was down between .70-.80 USD.

The '
Well, that translates to $2,267 US with a 0.75 exchange ratio.

I'm also wondering where Bruce is finding equivalent instruments for $1,700 or less. Everything that I have identified (so far) is higher priced, except for the less coveted models from the 1920s which are close, $1,800 to $2,000. I've also found a lightly used 1967 commercial Haynes available for $3,659.

Still looking...KM
 

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I bought a couple of Haynes in very rough shape a few months ago. I paid too much for the condition of the instruments, but one of the flutes had an interesting feature that I have seen on no other commercial model Haynes. It had a C# trill! I will be selling the other flute which I have reconditioned and will be keeping the one with the C# trill. Unfortunately the one I have done does not have a Haynes head.
Matt
 

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The NYC flute dealers (you know who they are) sell them (commerical hayneses) for $1700 - $2200, it seems.
The ones that sell on eBay go for around $1800 or under. I think Bruce is right, for the non-dealer price.
I wouldn't go over $2k (& the 2k one better be dead mint)
Don't get caught up & emotionally involved & pay too much for one, there's plenty out there, Haynes made a ton of them, over the years. (& they're all a bit different)
 

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Well, that translates to $2,267 US with a 0.75 exchange ratio.

I'm also wondering where Bruce is finding equivalent instruments for $1,700 or less. Everything that I have identified (so far) is higher priced, except for the less coveted models from the 1920s which are close, $1,800 to $2,000. I've also found a lightly used 1967 commercial Haynes available for $3,659.

Still looking...KM
you got it the wrong way around....

it worked out to be to be $1200 and $1700 Australian dollars including currency conversion, shipping and taxes.
there's no way I'd pay over $2k for one.
 

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Well, that translates to $2,267 US with a 0.75 exchange ratio.

I'm also wondering where Bruce is finding equivalent instruments for $1,700 or less. Everything that I have identified (so far) is higher priced, except for the less coveted models from the 1920s which are close, $1,800 to $2,000. I've also found a lightly used 1967 commercial Haynes available for $3,659.

Still looking...KM
Flute Centre of NY had an early 60's Haynes not long ago for $1800......and I find them to generally be a bit over priced- they carry some good stock though.
 

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Actually what Galway said was his Haynes was difficult to play in tune, which I believe was why he switched to a flute that was easier to play in tune. Which was what my comment was about, namely if a new player has a couple of thousand to spend on a flute, does it make more sense to buy a flute that plays in tune with itself easier. I was under the impression that the Cooper scale minimized some of the issues of sharp notes, which I think would make having a Cooper scale beneficial to a new player whether they were in a symphony or not.
Rampal's flute was in this serial range 1958 (27242 - 28333).

As far as the other guys statement, if you like Galway's tone & concept, well, thats great, thats the "modern" sound, I suppose. He played a Haynes when he was a young guy & learned the right way to play, then gravitated towards a brighter sound & equipment that let him achieve the concept he heard in his head. (In my Link analogy, the same could be said about Mike Brecker's gravitating to high baffle, after playing Links earlier in his career--in his case, because of his throat condition)

The point is, Galway could play an old Haynes & believe me, it wouldn't sound dull or lifeless (or outta tune), cuz he KNOWS how to play one.

So many players use pre-cooper scale & have NO problems. Gary Schocker, Lew Tabackin, play pre-cooper hayneses. Probably 80% of the Broadway woodwind doublers in NY use pre-cooper Hayneses & Powells, with no problem. Cooper scale, if you play in today's symphony orchestras, would make you life more easy, but in almost all other cases...Ya don't need it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
you got it the wrong way around....

it worked out to be to be $1200 and $1700 Australian dollars including currency conversion, shipping and taxes.
there's no way I'd pay over $2k for one.
Yes, indeed! Must have been wishful thinking on my part. That's really more like $1,300 US, a BIG diffrence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
The NYC flute dealers (you know who they are) sell them (commerical hayneses) for $1700 - $2200, it seems.
The ones that sell on eBay go for around $1800 or under. I think Bruce is right, for the non-dealer price.
I wouldn't go over $2k (& the 2k one better be dead mint)
QUOTE]

I think that may be it -- pricing by commerical (pun intended) dealers versus eBay (or similar sources). I've been dealing with mainly the former, because I haven't found anything of interest at the latter. For example, I just received an email quotation of $2,150 for either of a 1953 or 1955 Haynes commercial (closed hole, offset G and C foot) from an outfit in Michigan. And a couple of the earlier prices I noted were from another dealer, also in Michigan (in a different town).

I must admit mixed feelings with eBay instrument purchases. A couple of years ago I bought a Conn 10m that was a big disappointment and required an overhaul (the pads were musty beyond belief, as was the case) and it had more dents than I could count. I wound up selling it (luckily) at net break-even, rather than keeping it to play. So, for me this is like comparing a "bird in the hand" (the 1961 model that I have on loan) with a "pig in a poke", an expression that refers purchasing something sight unseen or, in this case, seen up close, touched and played (e.g., anything on eBay).

This discussion has been very helpful to clarify these points. I still haven't made any decisions but I now have a much better framework for that.

Thanks to all...KM
 

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A 1967 open hole, C foot, thin wall Haynes I have had for 30 years is a joy to play even though it is pre-Cooper scale. Adding a teflon head cork with O-rings seemed to increase the possible volume level which was nice. It is definitely a keeper. The seller was Fred Paulus, a commercial real estate person in Beverly Hills, who told me that it had been owned by Charles Lloyd, the jazz tenor saxophonist and flutist.
 
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