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OK, so I just jumped and purchased a brand new Series II. Some questions are arising! To me, the key heights seem too open (mainly classical playing) and the tension feels too heavy? 2 techs have looked at the horn, and one says: the heights are too open but tension ok, and another tech says key heights are ok, but tension is too heavy. Also, I am curious what the pip opening diameter on the new manufactures is supposed to be. I'm sure the specs are posted here somewhere, but with so much info on this site, I can't find the information I'm wondering about. Thanks
 

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It would help if you specified alto or tenor, etc.

I don't think you should be asking a tech whether the spring tension is right. The question is whether it feels right to YOU. Key height implicates more objective considerations, since it affects intonation as well as feel.
 

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OK, so I just jumped and purchased a brand new Series II. Some questions are arising! To me, the key heights seem too open (mainly classical playing) and the tension feels too heavy? 2 techs have looked at the horn, and one says: the heights are too open but tension ok, and another tech says key heights are ok, but tension is too heavy. Also, I am curious what the pip opening diameter on the new manufactures is supposed to be. I'm sure the specs are posted here somewhere, but with so much info on this site, I can't find the information I'm wondering about. Thanks
Re pip diameter: Are you having issues? If not, don’t change it. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Any leaks? If you start adjusting spring tension, you may start revealing leaks that are otherwise overcome with greater pressure from your fingers.

A Serie II will never feel like a MI VI - it is a different mechanism. If you try to make it too light, it won’t work as well. I suggest you get to know the horn for several months, then start tweaking it. If you close the heights too much, intonation will suffer, and the horn will start to get stuffy — and no, Stuffy does not equal “classical”.
 

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Re pip diameter: Are you having issues? If not, don’t change it. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Any leaks? If you start adjusting spring tension, you may start revealing leaks that are otherwise overcome with greater pressure from your fingers.

A Serie II will never feel like a MI VI - it is a different mechanism. If you try to make it too light, it won’t work as well. I suggest you get to know the horn for several months, then start tweaking it. If you close the heights too much, intonation will suffer, and the horn will start to get stuffy — and no, Stuffy does not equal “classical”.
In my limited experience playing new Selmers, the action is typically set pretty stiff. I don't mean high-friction and unresponsive, I just mean the springs are fairly stiff.

If it were mine I would just play the heck out of it for a few months and then see what I thought.

It's kind of like the difference between Steinway and Mason & Hamlin pianos. The Steinways are a lot heavier action in my experience. Personally I like the lighter action of a M&H piano or a Conn saxophone, but again I would urge giving yourself some time to accustom yourself to the new machine.
 

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Re pip diameter: Are you having issues? If not, don’t change it. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Any leaks? If you start adjusting spring tension, you may start revealing leaks that are otherwise overcome with greater pressure from your fingers.

A Serie II will never feel like a MI VI - it is a different mechanism. If you try to make it too light, it won’t work as well. I suggest you get to know the horn for several months, then start tweaking it. If you close the heights too much, intonation will suffer, and the horn will start to get stuffy — and no, Stuffy does not equal “classical”.
In my limited experience playing new Selmers, the action is typically set pretty stiff. I don't mean high-friction and unresponsive, I just mean the springs are fairly stiff.

If it were mine I would just play the heck out of it for a few months and then see what I thought.
Good call. :twisted:

I have owned two new Selmer tenors - a Serie III and a Ref 36. The Ref 36 was the best playing modern Selmer that I've experienced, but that was achieved by having Randy Jones rebuild it. Yes, you can lighten the action, but there are limitations due to the design, for example the spring-loaded rods in the Eb/C keys. Both my Selmers had mild binding in the stacks that had to be eliminated before lightening the spring action, else the keys just got sluggish.
 

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Too light and the keys start bouncing and don't respond fast enough on rebound for fast passages. Won't keep up with your fingers, especially if the key heights are raised a little. Higher keys need slightly stiffer springs in my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Re pip diameter: Are you having issues? If not, don’t change it. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Any leaks? If you start adjusting spring tension, you may start revealing leaks that are otherwise overcome with greater pressure from your fingers.

A Serie II will never feel like a MI VI - it is a different mechanism. If you try to make it too light, it won’t work as well. I suggest you get to know the horn for several months, then start tweaking it. If you close the heights too much, intonation will suffer, and the horn will start to get stuffy — and no, Stuffy does not equal “classical”.
About a the pip diameter, I was more or less just curious what the current Series II lower pip opening specs were. And yep, this is my first excursion into the un-VI world. Yours and others advice to play the horn awhile before tweaking makes good sense. At this point, I'm not entirely certain that I'll keep the horn.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Too light and the keys start bouncing and don't respond fast enough on rebound for fast passages. Won't keep up with your fingers, especially if the key heights are raised a little. Higher keys need slightly stiffer springs in my experience.
I know not to have them make it too light. I've been there!!!! Ok, that makes sense that higher key settings would go with stiffer springs.
 
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