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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If anyone is familiar with the cadenza in the Animata molto part of the piece. After the third fermata it is 2 lower eigth notes followed by two higher eigth notes. On the print of the solo i have all of the lower eigth notes have teardrop shaped accents below them and i heard a recording where the player sounded like he was slap tounginging. Is it possible to slap tounge at different pitches? the eigth notes are at A in the staff to D just below. And a beter question is would it sound better to slap tounge or to just accent the heck out of the notes? Thanks guys and gals.
 

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Slaptongue on the cadenza. No need to do a hard slap.

If that's the only problem you have with the Ibert, then you're doing fine. :)
 

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Hey Saxamophy.

It is certainly possible to slap-tongue at different pitches, and some performers have variable amounts of success doing this (I am not one of them). When I perform this passage, I usually use a very light articulation on the upper notes and a fairly middle-of-the-road tongue on the lower notes.

When slap-tongue is done well, the artist can actually vary the dynamic, and I've always preferred when performers play these slap-tongued notes on the softer side. It lends a joking quality to the section.

E
 

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The slap tongue is what was originally written by Ibert for Sigurd Rascher. If you can perform the slap tongue, then you should do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
okay thanks guys i just wasn't sure since i have heard most recordings without it. that will give me something to work on now :p
 

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okay thanks guys i just wasn't sure since i have heard most recordings without it. that will give me something to work on now :p
...and don't think of it as a slap tongue. Done properly, the effect is very close to a string pizzicato, as opposed to a violent, garish noise.
 

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Just don't push air through the horn when you try the slap. It really is just bouncing the reed off the mouthpiece, not actually playing the note. All you do is seal the tongue to more of the reed and drop the tongue. It's kind of like making a click by sealing your tongue to the roof of your mouth, only you do it on the reed. No blowing.

"Is it possible to slap tounge at different pitches?"

You should hear whatever note you're fingering when you do this.
 

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I'm just thinking of the years I practiced early on to get RID of the slaptongue.
 

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i know isn't it funny how good beginning saxophonists are at extended techniques without even knowing it!
 

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This style of slap tonguing is done by cupping your tongue (within your normal embouchure) and pushing it on the reed (like a plunger). Next pull down and back on the reed while gently letting some air into the horn. It's not necessarily a violent gesture... just pull down quickly.
 

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i know isn't it funny how good beginning saxophonists are at extended techniques without even knowing it!
When I showed up at Ithaca, Jamal Rossi talked to my parents and said, "When your son returns home at breaks and is practicing, you're going to hear sounds you haven't heard in 10 years. This time, it's on purpose." Boy was he right :)
 
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