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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #1
What a great show at the local community college here! Lloyd was with bassist Rueben Rodgers and Drummer Eric Harland in a small hall seating about 200 people. Only three guys and they still filled the room with plenty of sound.

Now I've not had the chance to study Lloyd's work much. So, I didn't know exactly what to expect. I looked on stage before they started and there was a very early silver Conn tranny with split bell keys with a metal Link. I'm thinking big roaring sound to come right? Wrong! I listened to him play some of the most sweetly beautiful, subtle yet aggressive tones I could have ever thought would come of a sax. Terrific stuff! Plus he played alto flute, clarinet and even started the show on piano while telling his poetry. Every note meant something in a mature way that only a senior statesman like himself can do.

I now have to start rethinking my sound after seeing him. I was that taken by the show.
 

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tjontheroad said:
Only three guys and they still filled the room with plenty of sound.
Sure, but are they investing their money wisely? ;)

Rory

ps. Lloyd had a huge jazz "hit" in the early 70s with Forest Flower; for fun you might want to compare what you heard with his classic early live album recorded at the Talinin jazz festival (with that SOB Keith Jarrett on piano:) )
 

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I love them. They really know about how to express music. I saw when Jarrett played the inside of a piano with a Guitar pick. Weird stuff man! A lot of expression though.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
rleitch said:
Sure, but are they investing their money wisely? ;)

Rory

ps. Lloyd had a huge jazz "hit" in the early 70s with Forest Flower; for fun you might want to compare what you heard with his classic early live album recorded at the Talinin jazz festival (with that SOB Keith Jarrett on piano:) )
Well, he told me, when met him afterwards, that horn was the only one he plays. So I hope his GAS budget goes to his savings account :)

When I said I have not studied him, that didn't mean I never heard his stuff. I just wasn't as familiar with his sound. There's so many great players to listen to. I'll be getting more into Lloyd in the future.

I was thinking while listening about the fact a great players setup has little to do with an notion of what their sound is. I said to him that I learned something that night and thanked him.
 

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T.J., I know what you mean. Charles' sound is the only one I envy.I obviously admire many other players but he's the only one I would truly love to emulate myself.
 

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ChuBerry47 said:
I love them. They really know about how to express music. I saw when Jarrett played the inside of a piano with a Guitar pick. Weird stuff man! A lot of expression though.
Not unusual. Google 'prepared piano'
 

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Lloyds tone is amazing - one of the best out there. And I love those glisses. Did he do any of that crazy dancing where he sticks his elbow out above his head?
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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tj: You didn't by any chance dare to ask him about his posture when playing, did you? ;) If anyone has any info on how he came to that, i'd be really fascinated. I'm saying this in the context of realising that he's a total master, of course. I always wondered if seeing Lester Young maybe sent him in that direction, or something..
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #9
He didn't do any crazy elbow tricks ;) But as his solos got more intense, he started dancing like the sax version of AC/DC's Angus Young. All the while, his tone had the most complete balance of sweetness and guts I think I ever heard on a tenor live. I can't think how it could even come across as good on record. Plus, the rhythm section was hot, smokin' and swingin'.

He told a funny story about the first time he came to Philly with Cannonball. He said started playing a solo and as usual he had eyes closed. When he opened his eyes, John Coltrane was standing right in front of him staring back at him. I couldn't imagine how intimidating and nerve racking that must of been for the rest of the show in his early days.
 
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