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I'm thinking about picking up a Bb clarinet.

I play the Tenor Sax, is there any similarities? Is the fingering similar? I don't think I'm prepared to spend any more more than I'm already paying for saxophone lessons on clarinet lessons, so is there any resources I can use to casually progress with the clarinet?

Can I bring my knowledge of tunes from saxophone over to clarinet?
 

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Yes, many of the same theories (at least fingering designs) are similar, but that's where it ends. The clarinet is built on 12ths, the saxophone on octaves, and covering those little holes can be the death of you. That is why they call it The Black Stick of Death. So on clarinet I think alto sax below the break and soprano sax above the break (I am an improvisor . . .) . . . and the break is a HUGE hill to climb, to say nothing about the different embouchure.

But don't let THAT stop you - I'm glad I stuck with it. DAVE
 

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You can get great clarient deals on US eBay. Those high school kids must give up playing clarinet as soon as they graduate! I got a Vito Resotone 3 for $42USD - it cost me more than that to ship to Australia but it's a terrific horn.

As for the similarities, there are enough to make the doubling feasible for an adequate tenor player. The problems come with the finesse. With the possible exception of the classical saxophone sound, there is a wide variety of acceptable, even desirable, saxophone tones. The same is not true of clarinet so you'll need to work hard to get the tone right and that starts with the embouchure. The fingering can't be sloppy, and of course you sort of need to be able to read in two keys and learn how to cross the break.

All that is harder to say than do. Give it a go - you'll find the clarinet a hugely rewarding instrument to play and it will hone your sax skills and possibly get you more gigs.
 

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Be patient - It will be slow and frustrating - then, all of a sudden, it will come together quickly. Good Luck
 

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I started on clarinet as a kid and played through high school. I bought a tenor sax a few years ago thinking it would be pretty much the same only bigger. I was surprised. The embouchure is completely different. On clarinet your mouth is much more firm around the mouthpiece. Tonguing on clarinet is a little harder too. Also the octave key takes you up a 12th and it's a lot harder to play the break smoothly. Still, I find clarinet easier for me since that's what I started on. My tone on sax is rough and the greater range of motion on the keys makes the fingering noticeably slower. Oh, and those narrow little reeds and the firmer embouchure dig into your lower lip way more than on sax. It takes a few weeks to toughen up the lip even if you're an avid sax player.
 

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you may consider Bass Clarinet.... you may use the same reed !!
 

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There is nothing wrong , with learning clarinet" dont spend too much though too start with, and thats one good aspect of clarinets you can pick up reasonably cheap ones that are of good quality,the buffet B12, is a excellent option!.
Its harder than saxophone, IMO, but it improves quickly if you put the time in!..
 

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I think that 2nd hand clarinets must be among the most undervalued instruments in the world! So, finding one is very easy , playing one is not that easy. I am clearly struggling with it although I din't put too many hours and too much energy into learning it. I love the sound of the lower register but the transition among registers is difficult and counterintuitive for a sax player and placing the fingers properly on an instrument with open holes is also not so easy.
 

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Much easier to go from clarinet to sax. My son is 7 -- the clarinet is too big for him, so I've been looking for an Eb...but I firmly believe this is the best way for a kid to learn sax: play the clarinet first.
 

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Much easier to go from clarinet to sax. My son is 7 -- the clarinet is too big for him, so I've been looking for an Eb...but I firmly believe this is the best way for a kid to learn sax: play the clarinet first.


have you considered the Clarineo?
http://www.clarineo.co.uk/


this is our member STAN on clarineo

 

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I am sure you have it there too, but this is the address of Graham Lyons , the inventor of the Clarineo, [email protected]
 

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As someone who started playing sax and added clarinet in college, I personally wish I'd learned clarinet first, as the technique on clarinet is a LOT more challenging, and not at all similar to the sax. Sax and flute actually have more in common, once you get past the tone production difficulties of flute. And I don't agree that clarinet is a desirable prerequisite for sax. They don't have that much in common once you get past the single reed. If you want to play sax, play sax and study with a good teacher. Using clarinet study to clean up sloppy hand position, bad embouchure, etc. is poor use of practice time. Casual study of clarinet could be fun depending on your goals, but it's harder to play than the similarity in key layouts might suggest.
 

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You can get great clarient deals on US eBay. Those high school kids must give up playing clarinet as soon as they graduate! I got a Vito Resotone 3 for $42USD - it cost me more than that to ship to Australia but it's a terrific horn.

As for the similarities, there are enough to make the doubling feasible for an adequate tenor player. The problems come with the finesse. With the possible exception of the classical saxophone sound, there is a wide variety of acceptable, even desirable, saxophone tones. The same is not true of clarinet [...]
There once was some variety in acceptable clarinet timbre. That began, and ended, with the clarinet's acceptability in jazz. The few really good jazz clarinetists still playing today have much more classical tone quality than those of the 1920s to 40s era, and it has to do with professional training and ability, which are much more stringent, if not limiting.
 

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I think that 2nd hand clarinets must be among the most undervalued instruments in the world! So, finding one is very easy...
This is so true. A friend offered to sell me his Selmer Bb clarinet that is in working order for $25. I don't play clarinet but for this price I have no excuse not to. There are three players in my school's symphonic band that are threatening to quit. If they do and you still haven't found one I may be able to get you an insider price on one.

Good luck with your search.
 

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I'm thinking about picking up a Bb clarinet.

I play the Tenor Sax, is there any similarities? Is the fingering similar? I don't think I'm prepared to spend any more more than I'm already paying for saxophone lessons on clarinet lessons...
Why not finish learning the tenor sax???

Then, in 40 years or so, you can start accumulating doubles: clarinet, alto clarinet, flute, piccolo, trumpet, ad nauseum...
 

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I'm thinking about picking up a Bb clarinet.

I play the Tenor Sax, is there any similarities? Is the fingering similar? I don't think I'm prepared to spend any more more than I'm already paying for saxophone lessons on clarinet lessons, so is there any resources I can use to casually progress with the clarinet?

Can I bring my knowledge of tunes from saxophone over to clarinet?
Tenor sax to clarinet....HA! Have fun with that one. It can be done, but it will take LOTS of work.

Similarities: They both use a reed. Both are in the key of Bb. Both are used to make 'music'.

IF you do end up getting a clarinet I would STRONGLY suggest getting a teacher for at least 4 lessons.
There are issues with the embouchure, hand position, horn angle, and tone production that are best learned one-on-one with a clarinet as a primary instrument teacher.
Usually when I see that someone wants to 'casually progress' it means that they want to learn fingerings. You can do that with a beginner book and youTube.

As for the 'bringing your knowledge of tunes over to clarinet'. Sure you can. Tunes are tunes. Just don't forget what horn you're playing and have your fingers go into sax mode.
 

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I started with sax when I was 9, and dabbled with my sister's flute so was always accustomed. 40 years later, I started playing clarinet. I really like the "flute" feel (open holes) and the compact size--it's such an expressive instrument...plays the blues very well. Never anticipated such a love affair, but I'm really digging cl
 

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I found one a buffet for 45 euros. I'm broke atm but otherwise i would have bought it right away
 
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