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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really like my tone since I switched to a Drake Sanborn piece. But miked it sounds tinny using the 98 and I dont want to dump more money into a different chordless. So I took the mik from inside the bell and adjusted it to over the bell on teh left side. So it was almost under the lip of the bell on the left. That took some edge off. I can switch pieces or use darker reeds but I want to do it with mik placement first. What do you guys do using the Shure system I record myself at home and it sounds fine to me so its the shure adding an edge to my tone. K
 

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The 98's are just edgy like that - EQ is your friend here. I'd roll off some of the low end too if you're clipped to the bell. I use mine live and clip it on the right side and point it just above the back of the bell towards the body of the horn. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks guys K
 

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According to Benade all of the harmonics above the "cutoff frequency" (roughly F#3 on saxes) travel past the open toneholes and go directly out the bell. This is why the "highs" are exaggerated when the mike is in the path of these harmonics. It is also why the "donut mute" used inside the bell in classical playing dampens the upper harmonics giving the tone a darker or rounder sound.
 

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I'd never heard of a donut mute before. Learn something new every day here.
If you search for it, you'll find that it has been mentioned many times over the years - especially among classical alto players. Some people just cannot get a dull enough tone. :whistle:
 
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We made our own donut mutes decades ago.
Wrap velvet fabric around a wood curtain ring and sew it up. Super easy. And sounds quite stuffy. Certainly dampens harmonics, including all. Not just higher.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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We made our own donut mutes decades ago.
Wrap velvet fabric around a wood curtain ring and sew it up. Super easy. And sounds quite stuffy. Certainly dampens harmonics, including all. Not just higher.
Yeah. Larry Teal discusses these and how to make them in The Art of Playing Saxophone (on pages 52-53). He claims that they were introduced (into the US, at least) by Marcel Mule.
 

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We made our own donut mutes decades ago.
Wrap velvet fabric around a wood curtain ring and sew it up. Super easy. And sounds quite stuffy. Certainly dampens harmonics, including all. Not just higher.
Or you could adjust your neck octave pip for a slight leak.
 
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Conn NW II Soprano, NW I Alto, 10M Tenor, NW I C Melody & Allora Bari.
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If you search for it, you'll find that it has been mentioned many times over the years - especially among classical alto players. Some people just cannot get a dull enough tone. :whistle:
LOL!

Like those jazz players that spend money on those special jazz mouthpieces and can't get an edgy, bright enough tone. :)
I have a nice enough tone without those but I have heard they can help with intonation on some of the lower notes. I'm still skeptical and haven't tried one.
 

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Yeah. Larry Teal discusses these and how to make them in The Art of Playing Saxophone (on pages 52-53). He claims that they were introduced (into the US, at least) by Marcel Mule.
I've been listening to Marcel Mule. I would like to find the sheet music for Saxo- Folly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I used the donut all the time on my classical recital for graduation. It mellows the tone to a cello type if thats what you want. Perfet for the bozza things I was doing way back then. K
 
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The 98's are just edgy like that - EQ is your friend here. I'd roll off some of the low end too if you're clipped to the bell. I use mine live and clip it on the right side and point it just above the back of the bell towards the body of the horn. Good luck!
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The EQ is definitely your friend here. Your particular FX chain may alter your particular approach. Digital user interfaces on modern boards really allows one to dial in their EQ rather easily. If I'm using such a board, or if I'm recording on a DAW, I'll cut everything below 120 Hertz. It's just excess noise for the saxophone. If the horn sounds too hot with everything else being left at flat, roll the highs back a bit. If the horn now sounds a little dead, most digital equalizers give you the ability to create a narrow band "spike", which can bring a little sparkle to the tone in the upper mid-range. My general philosophy is that a little goes a long way, and that a bit of experimentation can lead to some fantastic results.
 
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