Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
1996 Selmer SA80 2 tenor,
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So... my son twisted my arm a couple of years ago and talked me into joining a community marching band that marches in all the area parades. This was no problem at all when I was 17. Now, at 51, carrying a tenor saxophone for 3+ hours is a big pain in the neck. I am looking for a good harness but am leery about one of the ones that has the clip directly attached to the chest strap. I want something that I can still play my saxophone to the side like its supposed to be played. I searched the site, and am not seeing any recent posts about neck straps. Does anyone use anything that they really like that will take the pressure off of my neck but still work like a neckstrap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I recognize your problem.

You could look at this alternatives, where the load is on the shoulder instead of the neck.



For at home I use the Saxholder pro, but that is not suited for marching.
 

·
Registered
Conn NW II Soprano, NW I Alto, 10M Tenor, NW I C Melody & Allora Bari.
Joined
·
271 Posts
I got one of those Adorence shoulder straps to use with my Bari Sax and like it. I also have a Protec neck strap with the comfort bar in the front. That little comfort bar makes a big difference IMO. The Protec is also designed to keep the weight off your spine. I got back problems and those two neck straps have made it mutch more comfortable to play.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,293 Posts
I also have and adorence. I have bone spurs in my cervical vertebrae. The adorence saved me, and doesn't make me look like I need a ball gag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
After much physical neck and upper back disturbance, trying all the above and more choices, I found the Balam Premium Neck Strap at The Boston Sax Shop. It's pricey, however it is superbly manufactured, adjustable and 100% comfortable. I ceased searching after I found this strap. It will should last a lifetime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I use a BA sling on baritone , well built easy to use , walk around house while playing without a problem . Goes around neck and around shoulder, either side, like a guitar strap . Takes most of the pressure off neck and lets the horn move around well . One quick release to secure , and metal snap to horn . Big relief from weight of a bari .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
I use a BA sling on baritone , well built easy to use , walk around house while playing without a problem . Goes around neck and around shoulder, either side, like a guitar strap . Takes most of the pressure off neck and lets the horn move around well . One quick release to secure , and metal snap to horn . Big relief from weight of a bari .
What is a BA sling?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
You could also consider a Hooki. I have one and it works great. Different design than anything listed here. The weight of the sax sits very solidly and securely off the top of the shoulders and off of the neck.

Interesting but it seems to be touching your body in pretty much the same spots as saxholder. The rubber pads on the back land in nearly the same places (actually a little closer to your neck on the Hooki) and there’s the pad in the front. The only difference seems to be the armature only goes around one side instead of both which— considering that some people’s issue with saxholder is feeling like the horn could fall off if they bend over— I’m not sure is an improvement. I would try it though for a sleeker look anyway!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,230 Posts
I have a Saxholder. It’s a great invention. It changed how I play the sax But for marching I believe the Hooki is much more secure.

The weight of the horn where Hooki rests on the upper back is horizontal, it may intersect a point where the Saxholder is in the upper back. For the most part on the Hooki the horns weight is evenly distributed on the upper back pads. On the Saxholder, for me, the weight distribution varies depending on how forward I lean. Greater pressure shifts to the ends of the Saxholder arms on the upper back when leaning forward, and shifts to the top of the shoulders when standing straight.

The Saxholder takes the weight on the shoulder and when bent forward on the top of the back I find it is more pressure per square inch than the Hooki.

It is two different playing experiences. For anyone that has shoulder damage, the Hooki might help in ways the Saxholder does not because of the placement of the damage. The same could be said of the Saxholder or any possible solution. The Hooki gives shoulders full range of motion without it falling off where the Saxholder can fall off.

To decrease pressure per square inch, I cut up some Crocs and added it to the Saxholder shoulder grips. For me it made a big difference. I tried that on the Hooki as well but it is better for me without adding the padding on.

I also have a Gemini Harmess and used to own a Balam as well. Both are also great options.

Just an add on to say that the Hooki does not take any weight on the top of the shoulder at all, only on the horizontal grip pads , and a minimal bit of the front of the body, but I don’t notice it. When placed properly. the Hooki metal tube rides over the top of the shoulder without touching it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
I have a Saxholder. It’s a great invention. It changed how I play the sax But for marching I believe the Hooki is much more secure.

The weight of the horn where Hooki rests on the upper back is horizontal, it may intersect a point where the Saxholder is in the upper back. For the most part on the Hooki the horns weight is evenly distributed on the upper back pads. On the Saxholder, for me, the weight distribution varies depending on how forward I lean. Greater pressure shifts to the ends of the Saxholder arms on the upper back when leaning forward, and shifts to the top of the shoulders when standing straight.

The Saxholder takes the weight on the shoulder and when bent forward on the top of the back I find it is more pressure per square inch than the Hooki.

It is two different playing experiences. For anyone that has shoulder damage, the Hooki might help in ways the Saxholder does not because of the placement of the damage. The same could be said of the Saxholder or any possible solution. The Hooki gives shoulders full range of motion without it falling off where the Saxholder can fall off.

To decrease pressure per square inch, I cut up some Crocs and added it to the Saxholder shoulder grips. For me it made a big difference. I tried that on the Hooki as well but it is better for me without adding the padding on.

I also have a Gemini Harmess and used to own a Balam as well. Both are also great options.

Just an add on to say that the Hooki does not take any weight on the top of the shoulder at all, only on the horizontal grip pads , and a minimal bit of the front of the body, but I don’t notice it. When placed properly. the Hooki metal tube rides over the top of the shoulder without touching it.
I think there's some fairly large variability in where the saxholder is resting on people's bodies depending on their basic body size/shape, how they received it and how they adjusted it. It's flexible enough that I swear the people who say anything short of "I feel absolutely nothing, zilch, nada of the weight of the horn on my body" must just not be setting it up the same way I have it.

I have mine adjusted with the back pads resting in the orange spots in this photo. From there until the front pad, nothing touches my body. It's like one of those water-walking insects in how delicately it's touching me to do its job. "Pressure" is the last word that would ever come to mind! Yes it's a bit loose if I were to need to dance around (I can slide out of it without unclicking the bars), but I do move around freely without thinking about it all day long and I never feel like I'm going to drop my horn.
Arm Human body Jaw Elbow Font
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top