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Discussion Starter #1
I was unable to find a stand for my curved soprano. So I bought an alto stand and modified it.

I bought an On-Stage Stands double sax stand from musiciansfriend for $30. It's the SXS7201B.

I drilled another hole in the vertical piece, a few inches higher than the other two, for the bottom bell support. Then I used a small grinding bit on a Dremel in a rather weak attempt to make the round hole into a square hole. It's not pretty, but it holds the square-headed bolt just fine.

Next, I narrowed the top bell support, using a vise. I took the end plugs off to expose the small-diameter metal rod inside. The neoprene sleeve is glued together, so I just slid it back a little. I carefully put the two ends of the curved piece into the jaws of a bench vise and carefully closed the jaws a little. I kept measuring the vise opening, and after every half inch I'd undo it and see how it fit the soprano bell.

I decided to use the vise technique on the lower bell support, too, although it probably wasn't necessary.

Now I have a perfect double sax stand for a curved soprano and an alto or tenor. Since I have an on-stage stands single sax stand (an SXS7101B), I can use the interchangeable parts to create various combinations. The stock pieces are adjustable for tenor or alto, but my new custom-bent piece will never fit an alto or larger bell again.

BTW, there's an attachment from on-stage stands that makes it into a Bari stand. It's the SXSA7201B.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

After drilling the round hole in an appropriate place (hold the soprano up and figure it out), square it out (on the sax side only) enough so that the bottom bell support lands in a good place. (The yellow tape is there only as a reminder to my son so that he doesn't end up at a gig with the wrong piece in his stand, since we have a single stand also.)


Remove the end caps, push back the neoprene sleeve, and put it in a vise. Tighten a little at a time, measuring against the soprano bell after each half inch or so.


The finished product, with a Mark VI tenor, a Venus soprano, and a flute. Although it looks huge, the footprint of the base isn't much larger than the standard tripod of the single stand.
 

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So did I!

I followed pretty much the same technique apart from a few differences. First I just put one arm on the garage floor and tapped the other with a hammer until I got the right shape. Second I trimmed the length of the arms with my bolt cutters. Finally, I didn't bother squaring the hole. I just drilled a hole slightly smaller than the square bolt and then tapped the bolt into place with the hammer.

Sweet as a nut!
 

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Of course you all know curved sopranos were never meant for doubling. ;)
 

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A few years ago, I came across a curved soprano stand sold by Myatt in the U.K. It is, I suspect, a modified guitar stand but regardless, it works great for my curved soprano, keeping it low to the floor, and the stand collapses into a pretty compact package. I don't know if they are still available. DAVE
 

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If they're any good, they probably aren't :lol:
 

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I use my Hercules stand. I push the bottom support all the way up, fold it flat against the upright arm and the bell fits quite well in its holder. I can use this stand for tenor, alto and soprano.
 

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I don't currently have a curvy, but I'm holding on to this stand I bought from Myatt, I think, quite a while back. It's a Gig brand, and is built like a tank. Is this what yours is like Dave?
 

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I took the Hercules Stand and put some foam pipe insulation on the yoke with the lower support flipped up for my Steve Goodson curved Sop. Pull the insulation off and you're back to a tenor/alto stand.
 

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I have several Hercules and decided to make one for curved soprano from an alto-tenor one. Just drilled another hole where I placed the lower support made the U shaped support narrower and it works fine it offers a good portable solution, at home I have a curved soprano K&M stand.
 

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I took the Hercules Stand and put some foam pipe insulation on the yoke with the lower support flipped up for my Steve Goodson curved Sop. Pull the insulation off and you're back to a tenor/alto stand.
Genius! I'd love to see a picture of that, but I guess I'll figure it out when my Venus soprano arrives. I already have the Hercules alto stand and have never used it.
 

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you need to modify it, which means placing the bell rest higher up ( you need to make a hole further up the supporting bar and move the support) and push the top bell-rim support tighter together.
 
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