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I don't know if it was too much pracice or my daily weight lifting routine but that pain was brand new for me and I had gigs so I had to do something. So what I've changed now is that I do a 10 minutes standing mediation routine before I play anything on flute or sax first thing in the morning. I was also sick and couldn't do my gym stuff so this addressed two things. I took tai chi chi gung years ago and It was the best shape I felt in my life. So I went back to the chi gung warm up we used to do You can find standing meditations on you tube. heres one explanation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRXe1036zM4
believe me , I'd rather jump into my playing routine. but I like being out of pain. so I do this the pain went away in a week. K
 

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I have arthritis, so my hands become painful after about an hour of practice. More so if I'm playing soprano. I apply a small amount of CBD oil after and it helps alleviate the pain.
 

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I have arthritis, so my hands become painful after about an hour of practice. More so if I'm playing soprano. I apply a small amount of CBD oil after and it helps alleviate the pain.
You beat me to it. I was about to mention CBD oil.

I admit I was skeptical. But I was given the opportunity to try some CBD oil for free, and used on my knees, which are often very painful. I couldn't believe how well it worked. Subsequently, I've used it not only to keep my knees from bothering me, but also when I have back pain, or pain in my wrist or elbow, and it seems to help.

Your results may vary, obviously. But I was impressed, and I've continued using it.
 

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CBD, arnica, juniper oil, there are quite a few options, it's just a matter to find what works best. You may even try witches butter, topically applied it has no hallucinogenic effects :) (It's that yellow slime mold that grows on wood in the fall, the active ingredient is acrasin)
 

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CBD, arnica, juniper oil, there are quite a few options, it's just a matter to find what works best.
It is good to be free of pain, but my question is whether a treatment is reducing sensed pain because it reduces inflammation, or because it is masking the pain.
 

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It is good to be free of pain, but my question is whether a treatment is reducing sensed pain because it reduces inflammation, or because it is masking the pain.
I think they more or less reduce the inflammation. I've never felt any type of sensation from applying a topical CBD, only that the pain decreases.
 

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I think they more or less reduce the inflammation. I've never felt any type of sensation from applying a topical CBD, only that the pain decreases.
That you don’t feel any pain could still be attributed to deadening the pain feedback mechanism.
 

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CBD, arnica, juniper oil, there are quite a few options, it's just a matter to find what works best.
It is good to be free of pain, but my question is whether a treatment is reducing sensed pain because it reduces inflammation, or because it is masking the pain.
As a chronic pain sufferer for many years, I'll take less pain any way I can get it. Whether it's placebo or opiate-induced, any relief is welcome. Better the placebo obviously but when you are hurting, any port in a storm.

Two weeks ago I got an epidural steroid injection in my spine. The pain dropped by 80% in three days. Do I think it's for real and won't come back? Nope. Since I'm feeling better shall I hit the gym or play a round of golf? Nope. Am I glad I'm getting a few weeks of relief while my latest back injury heals? YEP.
 

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Pain is a very strange thing, you can feel it and it won't bother you and you can have just a smidgen of it and it drives you through the roof. Most of the treatments have historically been pain killer-based, the outcome of which is sad headlines right now but there have been many alternative approaches, such as desensitisation using capsaicin, anti-inflammatory drugs from the steroid family, acupuncture and acupressure, there is really not much of a limit.

Sometimes, it is enough just to break through the pain and interrupt the positive feedback loop to stop it for a long time, even after the drugs have worn off. Whatever works works, that's the bottom line. My anatomy prof in grad school was huge into pain and also ethnomedicine and I picked up as much from him as I could with respect to naturally occurring pain killers and antiinflammatory substances or else substances that increase inflammation, which by the end of the day is nothing but neovascularization because sometimes that's what is required to fix the source of the pain as long as it does not become chronic. Hopefully, your pain will stay away for a long, long time!
 

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Sadly sometimes nothing works. It may be some people's brains are just more sensitive to pain inputs. Even the most powerful drugs are about 40% effective. Sucks for me.
 

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That you don’t feel any pain could still be attributed to deadening the pain feedback mechanism.
Yeah, I don't know that much about it. It could be all in my head for all I know, like a Klangbogan. Or, my hands might start feeling better just because I stop playing and rested them.
 

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Yeah, I don't know that much about it. It could be all in my head for all I know, like a Klangbogan. Or, my hands might start feeling better just because I stop playing and rested them.
That is the point of pain, just like any other sensation, its perception is all in your head. That's why phantom pain exists. In your case, arthritis is essentially an auto-immune disease, and you may be able to rain it in with some steroids, a change in diet, dipping your hand alternating in hot/cold water, avoiding flu shots etc.
 

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That is the point of pain, just like any other sensation, its perception is all in your head. That's why phantom pain exists. In your case, arthritis is essentially an auto-immune disease, and you may be able to rain it in with some steroids, a change in diet, dipping your hand alternating in hot/cold water, avoiding flu shots etc.
Well, I have read where sugar is a big cause behind joint inflammation. And I'm highly addicted to it. Cookies, cakes, pies... Gotta go now. :cry:
 
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