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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working on a yas-21 and I noticed the pip is glued-in. I assume it was an emergency repair (?) I am wondering how to get the glue off so I can solder it in. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not sure. It is thicker than superglue but seems less brittle than epoxy. I also just found some on inside of bell-bow joint. (This model has clamp-on bell). It is a hazy-clear color.
 

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crashkahuna said:
I'm not sure. It is thicker than superglue but seems less brittle than epoxy. I also just found some on inside of bell-bow joint. (This model has clamp-on bell). It is a hazy-clear color.
Yamaha still uses epoxy for the body to bow seam under the reinforcement band. The bell to bow was always soldered, so I'm perplexed. The glue method was certainly not a factory job on the pip. See if it will "chip" or fracture using a very sharp knife edge and lifting the edge of the glue. It might easily separate from the lacquer, but depending on exactly what it is, it also might not. Try warming the area with a torch and remove the glue residual best you can with a q-tip or rag. Removal of ALL the glue will be required on the pip and the soldered ring area on the body hole in order for the pip to be resoldered in place. This final clean-up is where knowing exactly what that substance is would help me in regards to a solution. Be careful not to unsolder posts in the neighboring area. A close-up pic would help also.

I guess your bottom line is that you will have to heat the pip up and remove the glue, solder, and clean it up best you can, and same for the area around the pip hole on the body. It is always best to solder on bare metal, but often you can get old solder to flow again, if the areas affected are properly cleaned and prepared.
 

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Has the pip come out?

If not, then glue may have been used as a sealer, if somebody suspected a leaking soldering joint. In which case it will also be still soldered.

I remove superglue or epoxy with scraping or a dental burr.

If it is a hot-melt glue, then it is much more difficult to fully remove. Acetone could probably be used on a Yamaha. (Try carefully! it dissolves most lacquers, but pretty safe on Yamaha in my experience.)

You could just glue it back. This is not a location that needs a lot of structural strength. Glue, providing it sticks well to the surfaces, would do the job just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I will try to get a pic - thanks. Looking down the body tube it looks like it is a factory solder job (very little solder). But I do see some light using the leak light so maybe the solder was not sealing it.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
You could just glue it back. This is not a location that needs a lot of structural strength. Glue, providing it sticks well to the surfaces, would do the job just fine.
Right up until it get's knocked loose again by a pad saver device or a generic fake chamois swab.. :shock:
 

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Yes, possibly. But not all players are silly.
 

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The register tube on my bass clarinet (one part of it, the other is actually screwed in) is glued with epoxy for a long time now and that haven't been a problem.
 

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clarnibass said:
The register tube on my bass clarinet (one part of it, the other is actually screwed in) is glued with epoxy for a long time now and that haven't been a problem.
Lots more meat in the body of a BC where the register vent is positioned compared to that area of a saxophone body tube..
 
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