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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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Yeah - must be the neck. I believe someone makes straight tenors. Perhaps get your hands on one of those?
except the neck, of straight tenor is not straight-er than for curved tenors! It's the same neck!

Music Medic sells even a double bent " talto" ( tenor shaped alto) neck ( Used by Roy Benson prior to MM for many years already, and theirs it is meant for children can you imagine what it would be like to educate children with " extra" resistance ... There isn't ! )

There is not an objective problem in S necks.



 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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42,172 Posts
By the way, if the " problem" would be only in the S shape or double bend, there are both vintage (I didn't know this years ago and I learned here) and modern tenors witha straight neck.

But I don't think that it was a problem otherwise this would have caught on

Jan Garbareck played one ( was a Keilwerth ?)


Anyway there were vintage too

Sorry, took a little longer than expected, but thumbnails of a straight necked tenor below:



As far as I (and my tuner) can tell, the intonation is no better nor worse than the goose neck. Without the curve the straight neck is slightly shorter, but I suspect the difference is compensated for by the mouthpiece position. It would take a far better player than I to really put both horns through their paces and draw a definitive conclusion, so if anyone's in my neck of the woods ...;)

If anything it's perhaps just a very little more comfortable to play, as the horn sits slightly straighter.

Of absolutely no real significance, but the two straight neck models I own have serial numbers only 12 apart. The goose neck is some 3000 newer.
AND by the way, this is another chunk of food for thought, if the idea of the double benT S shape was increasing resistance why would Oleg have resuscitated an Idea first used by Orsi the S shaped baritone neck?



 
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