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Im not sure what is wrong with me but someone please help Im in pure shock right now. After the drop i looked at it and saw only three parts damaged; the low C key was dented in and the cover over the key is bent. there is also a large dent on the bel and a small one under the thumb rest for the octave key. I tried playing it, the g key is sticky and middle/low f, e , and d arent coming out and of course the low c.
Can this be fixed? if it can will it be the same?
does anyone know someone who can do a good job and fix this horn in southern california?
 

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That's sad but not super hard to fix. There will be lacquer lose where the dents were. Remember it was all a flat piece of brass at one time. I'm sure south cali has lots of places that can to it. Relax
 

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No worries! It only hurts resale value. If you're not planning on selling any time soon, then you've got nothing to worry about. Just make sure you take it to a competent tech for the repair, even if it costs a little more. It's better to pay a bit more upfront than to have someone do a bad job the first time through and make it tougher for the next guy to correct the "repair" the second time through.
 

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Stuff happens! No worries, I’ve had a couple of bad injuries to my vi’s and they’ve lived through it (me as well). The worst was my alto (147,xxx) being catapulted off a stage when my shoulder strap got caught under the leg of my stand when I picked it up. I remember seeing it bounce off a large decorative rock in front of the stage and then hit the floor. Oof!

I lucked out on that one, the high f rod took the brunt of the damage and absorbed the shock and nothing else really was damaged. I was paranoid it wouldn’t be the same, and it was a bit different after as some of the spring tension was tightened in the process of getting that rod straightened out. I had my horn repadded though after that and I can’t recall how it even played before the drop, it’s in a much better playing state now.
 

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I know you said SoCal (and you have gotten a bunch of suggestions) - just adding into the mix Eric Drake in Berkeley. He does amazing metal work. He has done beautiful work for me on major dents and bent body tubes. He is busy, though, so turnaround can sometimes be slow.
 

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I’m sure the others mentioned on this thread are great, but from personal experience I can highly recommend Les Arbuckle in Carlsbad. You can find his info on his website at saxoasis.com . Very experienced with MarkVIs, a straight shooter. He’ll have your horn playing as well or better.
 

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I would go to Les, like Claxton suggested...Les is a great guy to deal with, I've bought several horn's from him myself, he's a great repairman/player, and he's honest.
 

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My Mark Vi has more dimples on the bow than a fat ladie’s ***. A roadie dropped it moving equipment on a large stage. I was livid but at least I knew they would pay to fix it. The worst part was getting through the gig with it. It wouldn’t play below low D.
After thousands of hours of playing, gigs and miles she’s showing her age.
Contrary to some people’s opinion, Selmers are workhorses as well as playing great. At least when it’s beat back into shape it’ll play the same.
The MarkVI doesn’t travel anymore.
 

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Echoing the recs for Les Arbuckle. Krys Mach (Pasadena Woodwind Repair) has also done good dent work (and other repairs) for me in the past. I dropped my MacBook on my Mark Vi alto once, resulting in a dent in the bell. After Krys was done with I couldn’t tell where the dent had been. It helped that the horn had significant lacquer wear pre-dent. As someone else said, dent repair often results in loss of lacquer in the repaired areas.
 

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Mmmm, having done thousands of dent repairs (seriously) its easy to rough something out to a sort of shape and a sort of finish, but invisible, phew big job........

A job like that can become a nasty nasty job so quickly, so yeh.... to raise or rub the dent out on the back, the lacquer cracks and breaks off and leaves an ugly mess, the reshaping of the bell can crush the lacquer as well during the process and leave stretch marks and more finish issues, the keyguard is a nothing job in comparison to the bell and body

Minimise your expectations, expect huge price differences, ask to see their work

Steve
 

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Keep in mind as well that the shock can cause misalignments of other keys - so the tech will need to check the whole horn for leaks and it may be necessary to bend back posts or key arms that are not right at the obvious places. The Selmer being a "ribbed construction" horn the severity of this effect is a lot less than a "posts only" horn like a Conn.
 
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