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Ok guys, a little background information, I am a high school student, I've been playing four years. My school has a well known marching program and concert band, but over the years I've found my true love is jazz, (which my school offers). Until earlier this year (October) I've used my fathers beat up old Bundy 2 horn which had poor intonation among other things. I bought a used YAS-32 (European YAS-52) which I love. It is in like new condition, hardly any scratches or anything. (It could probably use some new pads down the road as some are rather dried out but overall I love my horn and It's even more special that I bought it myself. Anyway I want to upgrade from my 4C (sound like a familiar story?) and I'd like to keep the cost under 200$ which I think is doable. I have looked at multiple hard rubber pieces and even a few ebonite ones but I cant decide. My band directors wouldn't have any advice as they didn't study woodwind or saxophone or anything. Aside from basic student horn rental companies,(that don't have saxophone mouthpieces, trust me I called them all) there aren't any sax shops within a reasonable driving distance from me (northern Michigan) and I'm not sure what to do. Everyone else in the saxophone section uses the 4C and nobody else has the "jazzy" sound if you will. I've looked at the hard rubber Jody jazz, Vandoren V16, V16 s+, Java, jumbo java,Meyer, D'Addario Select Jazz, etc and I think I'd like a 6 or 7 opening. If anyone went through the same situation/or could just offer some advice it would be much appreciated...
Thanks guys,
-Largemouth21

Quick Side note, here is a video of a player who has the same style I'm shooting for. Smooth jazz I guess
 

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If you had a credit card, you could order them all or just a couple from WWBW.com and then keep the one you like. Send the rest back.
 

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If you had a credit card, you could order them all or just a couple from WWBW.com and then keep the one you like. Send the rest back.
How can I keep from scratching them which causes a fee to be charged... they also charge a 10$ sanitation fee plus shipping which I would estimate 10$ so that’s 20$ per piece that adds up quick...
 

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Exactly where in Michigan?
If you're reasonably close to me I might have a couple suggestions.
 

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Meyer New York is considered the "standard" type mouthpiece for jazz. I would start there. There are many so-called copies of the Meyer style for alto. You should probably start with a size 5. Don't try to go to a 6* or 7. Too big of jump up.

To keep from scratching, use a tooth pad (wrong name) and make sure your ligature isn't scaping on the piece.
 

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Interesting, b/c Bundy II's do not have bad intonation unless they are not in good playing shape (leaks, poorly regulated, etc). But that's academic at this point.

Rather than searching for/buying a SINGLE mouthpiece for $200...I suggest you buy several.

Meyer Rubber (5 or 6) = $100
Bari Esprit = $20
Brilhart Ebolin (3 or 4) = $30
Hite Premier = $25

would be my suggestions for you based upon the background you have shared......all good...they will all sound different and certainly way better than a 4C.....and I'd bet my bank account you'll have 2 keepers in there....
 

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Great that you have an excellent horn that you truly "own". Some great suggestions for mouthpieces above, I'll just throw in a reminder that all mouthpieces are crap with a crap reed. And a "crap" reed might be somebody else's favorite, or a great one on a different mouthpiece. Always best to have several reeds, hopefully some of different brands and strengths, when trialing mouthpieces to see which ones match up well. I've usually found it best to err on the side of a bit soft when moving to a more open tip, then maybe seeing if a stiffer one is a bit better after I've gotten the feel of the piece.
 

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How can I keep from scratching them which causes a fee to be charged... they also charge a 10$ sanitation fee plus shipping which I would estimate 10$ so that’s 20$ per piece that adds up quick...
Wow, they went up in price on their "sanitation" fees. Last time I returned one after a trial it was $3. Restocking fees are fairly standard. Jody jazz seems to be a little more lenient in that regard as long as you don't damage the mouthpiece in any way.
 

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To keep from scratching, use a tooth pad (wrong name) and make sure your ligature isn't scaping on the piece.
Tooth/mouthpiece patch. It's a good idea to put a thin patch on the mouthpiece body as well, underneath the ligature. This is especially necessary if your ligature has the screw(s) on top, which makes scratching far more likely. If you don't have mouthpiece patches, just use a couple pieces of sturdy tape. Make sure you remove the patches or tape completely after you are done testing, and gently clean off any residue. (Sometimes a mouthpiece will be shipped to you with a patch already in place on the beak. If so, just leave it there if you need to return the mouthpiece.)
 

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Mpc patch is advisable if you are trying it out to keep damage off.

Realistically, with any of the pieces you mentioned, you're going to have a quality piece. The opening worries me because it might be too big of a jump, so I would definitely order 2 or 3 tip openings for trying. You *can* make any piece work for you and no piece is going to get you a particular sound, it's all about how you work at it. Also, it's tough because (in my experience) it takes a year to fully grasp what the mpc can do for you. You'll get ideas from a week, maybe better handle after months, but I find the year mark is where my embouchure adjusts and I get a handle on what I can do with it.

Good luck!
 

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Yamaha 4c are very narrow pieces meant for beginners. It may be a big jump to go to a more open piece. I think you need to try some before buying.
The tip opening is important and , as others have said, I wouldn't go too wide.
A lot of people get on with the Rico metallite or graphtonite pieces which are really cheap. I'm not a huge fan, but if you are unsure about what to get spending just a little may be less painful than spending a lot!

I really like Vandorens and play on a tenor Java. I find the Jumbo Javas a bit of a struggle. The sound is too bright for me. But it may work for you. You can get a similar sound from matching the right reed to a particular mouthpiece.
 

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First of all go to a '5' around 70 thou +/- tip.. no more than 72 thou.right now.
I've used a Meyer from Philtone for years but, recently 'had a punt ' on Ebay for a D'addario 5 select jazz....won the auction and got the piece for less than half price and it's very,very good! excellent in fact, and I am very impressed. So that's an option, also a Selmer 'Soloist' re-issue C** these can be very good players too.
 

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First of all go to a '5' around 70 thou +/- tip.. no more than 72 thou.right now.
I've used a Meyer from Philtone for years but, recently 'had a punt ' on Ebay for a D'addario 5 select jazz....won the auction and got the piece for less than half price and it's very,very good! excellent in fact, and I am very impressed. So that's an option, also a Selmer 'Soloist' re-issue C** these can be very good players too.
+1 for the D’Addario Select in a size 5. I’ve a few Meyer-style mouthpieces, and these are very good. As others have said, .070” is a good tip opening for now, and will certainly not limit you in years to come. For a great many pros, .070” is solid all-round size on alto.
 

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Meyer New York is considered the "standard" type mouthpiece for jazz. I would start there. There are many so-called copies of the Meyer style for alto. You should probably start with a size 5. Don't try to go to a 6* or 7. Too big of jump up.

To keep from scratching, use a tooth pad (wrong name) and make sure your ligature isn't scaping on the piece.
Does meyer make a version of the NY now?
 

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A regular off-the-shelf Meyer in a 5 or 6 tip will take you about as far as you want to go. I say this as someone who started on one and went far afield with Javas, Dukoffs, Guardalas, Jody Jazz DVs etc and has since come back full circle to a Meyer 6M. Does everything I need it to, and does it well.
 

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I'll put in a word for the Vandoren V16. From what I can tell, Vandoren has maybe the best quality control of the mass production mouthpiece makers, and at $125 or so, the V16s are one of the best bang for the buck out there. If you do have a credit card, or if you can get someone who has one to help you, you could order one of these from an online vendor that offers a trial period (Musicians Friend does, just to name one I've used, but there are many others) and then return it if you need to. (Use it with a toothguard and put some electrical tape down to avoid ligature scratches.)

It does sound like you're probably ready for a more open mouthpiece, but it's difficult to guess what size might be right for you. I think I went from a 4C to a 6* way back when without too much difficulty, but everybody's different. One thing to remember: you can always go down a reed size or two while you're getting used to the larger tip opening.
 

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I second the V16. Vandoren quality control is top-notch and you're nearly guaranteed the mpc you get is a good example. I've played plenty of mpc's from other companies and thought I disliked the piece, only to find out I got a dud. Returning can be a pain and you're losing out on *some* money.

Also, I like V16s personally.
 

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Right now I am seriously enjoying my D'Addario D8M (.110 tip). Play it with a 2.5 Reed. Incredibly free blowing. Tuning is not quite as consistent as it is on my Vandoren T75 (.104), but it is more free blowing. (Probably me, not the mpc). The D7M has a slightly smaller tip opening and might be the perfect combination of free blowing and good tuning. The T75 is a medium large chamber so it might play rather flat compared to what you are used to. You would likely consider a straight medium version of the Vandoren Jumping from a 4 to a 7 is definitely a big jump. Remember, you will need to soften up your reed a bit when you make the mpc jump. You mouth might be sore for a bit.

Ultimately, if you are excited about the change, you will likely seriously enjoy anything you get.

One note: If you spend a lot of time in pianissimo, I don't think you will want a tip opening above .100.
 
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