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Recognizing the thread has been dormant for a while, I have an Alto version of this horn received at the beginning of the year from Windblowers in the UK for a practical price relative to what they go for in the U.S. I also have a fairly new Cannonball Stone series alto as a reference. Both horns are put together very well, I was not able to detect any play in the rods, something I could not say for the New Buffet 400 I had at one point among other things. Both horns play wonderful for me and I say that after a considerable amount of time on them instead of during the "Honeymoon" period where the newness tends to cloud judgement. I was floored by my level of contentedness with the Cannonball, especially after trying the fat neck which gave me the free blowing, low resistance play that I desire most. I wanted the Pro One mostly because I liked the way it looked along with its uniqueness in design.

Turns out it plays with the same freeness that the Fat neck does, no doubt the result of Mr. Ponzol's influence, and an added plus is that it is noticeably lighter than the Cannonball not that weight was a problem for me. The Antigua is also sprung tighter than the Cannonball which translates into the ability to play a little faster for me and although I adore the wide spatula style low level right F# keys of the Cannonball like those of the Yamaha 875, the variation from that arrangement with the Antigua was not a problem at all to adjust to. I really like that style of key which is a comfort focus for me.

The pads don't stick at all on either horn, something I couldn't say for my JK EX90 III, or the Buffet 400 which really had it bad except for the lighter fluid treatment which had to be repeated throughout ownership. The G# lift did its job, the Cannonball has a G# and low C# lift but they are hidden flat springs that are referred to as "relief springs" that lift those keys, so they went unnoticed until I cleaned the horn. Both horns feel quite comfortable in my hands and as much as I like the Cannonball, I spend 95% of the time playing the Antigua.

As for the Trident arms, they're a real eye catcher to me, however, they do have the tendency to remind me that they are there at the bump stop where the added weight of the key can generate a little more thump that can be felt through the horn. The beautifully machined screws present at the unique locations have to be checked periodically until the horn settles in play as I had two start to come loose, one of which resulted in a mild tin like sound and was hard to track down. Once they were addressed and the horn oiled, the mechanisms played smooth as butter. I really like the horn and am very happy with it after 8 months of ownership.
 
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