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Whether or not the trident arms make a difference on the bigger horns, I think they are probably overkill on soprano. How often are low-end leaks an intractable problem on sop the way they sometimes can be on alto, tenor, or bari? Yanagisawa has been using double arms on some of the bell pads on its top horns for 35 years (and we don't really know if they make a difference either). It doesn't use double arms on soprano. Why not?
 

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I've never known them to be a intractable problem on alto, tenor or bari.
That's why I said "sometimes." For some people, they can be; hence all the extra hardware on some horns. And you don't have to paste in a definition of "intractable"; I don't use words that I don't understand.

Anyway, the point of my post was not to lament the problem of leaks in general, but to assert that trident arms -- designed as a way to help eliminate leaks -- are overkill on a soprano sax. They are almost surely unnecessary. Do you agree with that?
 

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Absolutely I agree, but I also think they are unnecessary on any horn. The saxophone has survived nearly 200 years without them. I think the ProOne is a great horn (you can see my glowing praise o the Antigua website) but I think it would be just as good without them.
My sense is that Peter Ponzol & co. must really believe that the trident arms do help on the alto and tenor ProOne horns. Whether that's true or not, who can say? I've written in another thread that I have no idea whether the double arms on my Yanagisawa alto make a difference. I do know, however, that my Yany tenor works just fine with only single arms. Anyway, the alto and tenor probably established the trident arms as a "signature" feature of the ProOne horns, such that Antigua was reluctant to omit them from the ProOne soprano, lest customers think they weren't getting the full set of innovations.
 

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As I asked in the beginning, has anyone actually played one of these, especially the soprano?
That was in your first thread on the ProOne sop, and you learned that the answer is no. This thread was supposed to be for speculation about the features.

Look, someone has to be the trailblazer when a brand-new model appears. If you're really interested in this sax, just order one and try it out. It's not that expensive. You may love it. The worst that can happen is you won't like it, and will have to resell it. You'll take a loss, but it won't be gigantic.
 

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The street price on the sopranos is at least $2750. That is a lot to me right now, and for that much, there a lot of options in used saxes in great condition.
Buy it from a British dealer and ship it here. Have you seen the Antigua prices over there? At sax.co.uk, the ProOne Alto is $1499, and the ProOne tenor is only $1688. Just wait for the soprano to appear.
 
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