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After seeing a video ad with Ponzol talking about the trident arms preventing the pad cup from being blown open on the sides by the air column, I tried an experiment. Using a candle flame, I played low notes on a soprano near the flame and directly in front of the bell. If the air column can blow open a pad cup, it certainly can cause a flame to flicker.

Try it!
 

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I'm hoping you can follow through on the experiment. My observation is meaningless unless it is repeated with similar results.
 

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Why is this so difficult? If the air column can push a pad cup open on the sides, then it should be able to make a candle flicker.

But no one has the means to test this but me??
 

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> No one has said that air pushes open any pads.

I'll take credit for that. Ponzol says @ 3:17 in the video "they tend to vibrate and flutter". I interpreted flutter to mean the flapping in the breeze rather than vibrations causing this tendency to flutter (definition below).

Why? Because I don't buy the story of your weak little pinky not being able to keep a single or double arm key from vibrating. After 50+ years of playing saxophones, I don't feel any vibratory sensation causing pad cup wobble. The only vibration problems come on Eb/C rollers. It defies my logic and raise my BS alert.

Funny how the phenomena never came up much in conversation over the years prior to the invention. But they look cool.

Flutter
1: to flap the wings rapidly <butterflies fluttering among the flowers>
2a : to move with quick wavering or flapping motions <a sail fluttering in the wind>
b : to vibrate in irregular spasms <his heart fluttered>
 
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