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First photo looks like simple, basic lacquer corrosion or breakdown. Actually, pretty much the same with the second photo. Both pics are a combination of lacquer breakdown, wear, corrosion, etc. There's absolutely nothing to "remove".
 

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the first pictures show the remnants of acid bleed under the lacquer , the only way to remove that is removing the residual lacquer at that particular spot and proceed with a number of anti corrosives and mechanical action this lwill leave an area somewhat warn out which will be left unprotected unless you spotr relacquer, frankly speaking I would leave it alone. (same for next item)

The other picture shows lacquer in areas ( the mat ones) that has simply disappeared and left some small areas of lacquer behind (shiny areas). There is not much that you can do unless you want to remove the left lacquer and then having to deal with a large(r) unlacquered area which may tarnish green or acquire, in time, a darker patina.
 

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So many people here are promoting bare-brass saxes.
For some, they acquire a relatively even, relatively acceptable look., euphemistically called "patina"
So proponents tend to overlook that there is an equal chance of the sax looking like these photos.

But moving on to the case in point.
The first photo certainly looks like acid bleed, where poor manufacture results in un neutralised soldering flux remaining under the lacquer, to eat away at the metal.
But from the second photo I think it is possible that this sax was once nickel plated- rather badly so - and has been exposed to a corrosive environment. That haas leads to galvanic corrosion, which in spots and maybe other areas, eats away at the metal beneath the plating.

Whatever, dealing with it is probably a very big job, including replacing all soft materials on the instrument.
If it were a car, bike, or washing machine, you'd throw it away.
 

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I will collect all the unwanted thrown away saxophones with lacquer problems and suitably dispose of them
 

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Looks like ordinary lacquer degradation with time, possibly as noted a very humid or slightly corrosive atmosphere (near the ocean, perhaps?)

In theory the minor corrosion under the lacquer and in areas where it's flaked off, could affect the longevity of the instrument. However, everyone who is reading this forum will be dead before it results in any functional issue.

And I certainly would not dispose of an automobile, or bicycle, or appliance with that degree of surface finish degradation. In fact, my bicycle looks much worse, my car about as good as that, and while my kitchen appliances are all pretty much new (replaced for functional reasons, not because the finish got ratty), my saxophone cases (much closer to the subject) are all covered with scratches, scrapes, bare wood where the Tolex got scraped off, replacement latches pop-riveted in place, handles replaced with rope, etc.

My recommendation is to play the instrument and don't try to do anything about how it looks. If the appearance bothers you, turn your head away.
 

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If it doesn't affect the playability of the horn, consider it unique, one of a kind, character to your horn. There is none other like it and cant be replicated in the exact way. IMO... when the lacquer starts to break down you are really starting to get a special horn. Full of history and wisdom. Consider yourself privileged to have it in your possession and your part in the relationship is to make it sing.
 

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Actually, and I've done this, you can get a pretty good effect by lightly polishing with fine or super fine automotive cutting compound. It is likely to remove some of the failed lacquer, however, if you keep it cleaned and oiled you will get patina rather than corrosion.

Good luck and visit StuartSax on Facebook to see the bare brass saxes I've worked on.
 

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I will collect all the unwanted thrown away saxophones with lacquer problems and suitably dispose of them
Melt them down and make howitzer shells out of them.

If it doesn't affect the playability of the horn, consider it unique, one of a kind, character to your horn. There is none other like it and cant be replicated in the exact way. IMO... when the lacquer starts to break down you are really starting to get a special horn. Full of history and wisdom. Consider yourself privileged to have it in your possession and your part in the relationship is to make it sing.
So it's kind of like all that gray hair on my head, the sagging skin, the paunch, the wrinkles on the face? Special, full of history and wisdom. Yes, I think you have something there, aaronbigB.
 

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Yes, get on with playing it and - putting on my emotional cap - have respect for your wrinkly elder sax (See my signature)

(Save your $ for functional issues.)
 
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