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Good morning everyone, I've been practicing saxophone for 7 months, I practice longtone for 1,5-2 hours each day. But still I feel like I dont get that "centered" tone, it doesnt have a "body". FYI I use Dukoff D7, Rovner Versa, and Java Red 2,5
Do you have any tips on how to develop my sound to be more "centered"?
 

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If you can go to a music store that allows you to try different mouthpieces and see if you like something better than what you have now. Try mouthpieces with different inside shapes from the Dukoff. The Dukoff has a high baffle that is mostly for a brighter Dave Sanborn style of playing.
 

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The player's concept of sound, pressurized air, embouchure, and oral cavity are all of the elements that must work together. The best exercise I know of is to play middle C with the biggest sound you can make using the fingering for low C without the octave key, then switch to the regular C fingering and try to make it sound as full and rich as the "long fingered" C. Keep going back and forth working to make both sound the same. Do the same exercise with the fingering for low B and Bb. In my experience you can't "buy" a centered tone by changing equipment. It has to be an "inside job". :)
 

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The player's concept of sound, pressurized air, embouchure, and oral cavity are all of the elements that must work together. The best exercise I know of is to play middle C with the biggest sound you can make using the fingering for low C without the octave key, then switch to the regular C fingering and try to make it sound as full and rich as the "long fingered" C. Keep going back and forth working to make both sound the same. Do the same exercise with the fingering for low B and Bb. In my experience you can't "buy" a centered tone by changing equipment. It has to be an "inside job". :)
indeed.

Equipment is only a facilitator, your ears and embouchure that you change accordingly are the key to produce any tone.

If Equipment would be the key to sound we would buy this that or the other and sound like this that or the the, but, we don’t!

The video by Don Menza (which I have quoted ad nauseam ) says it all. YOU make the sound


Not only these other videos really show that the player is a large portion of the sound, think centered, work on it. Is THAT simple


 

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Now one only needs to define a “centered tone”.
OP says his tone does not have a "body."

I understand that to mean that he has more partials and overtones and not enough of the fundamental.

A graph of his note would be very far away from a tuning fork graph of a pure sine wave, and he does not want that.

If I were seeking that I would try to get a leg up with my gear: My 1920s late series True Tone Tenor, Ron Caravan mpc, and Rico #3 or 3.5 natural reed or a Legere classic 2.5 and any ligature that holds the reed on well. Least effort for most fundamental.
 

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Good morning everyone, I've been practicing saxophone for 7 months, I practice longtone for 1,5-2 hours each day. But still I feel like I dont get that "centered" tone, it doesnt have a "body". FYI I use Dukoff D7, Rovner Versa, and Java Red 2,5
Do you have any tips on how to develop my sound to be more "centered"?
A smaller chambered mouthpiece will "center" or "focus" the tone. Don't necessarily go for a high baffle.
 

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No reason why you can't get a focused "core" with that setup. You've been playing for 7 months, it takes a LOT of time to develop your personal sound. As others have said, the most important thing is to have that sound in your head when you play so you can work toward it. I'd also suggest getting a teacher if possible to help speed up that process.
 

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Good morning everyone, I've been practicing saxophone for 7 months, I practice longtone for 1,5-2 hours each day. But still I feel like I dont get that "centered" tone, it doesnt have a "body". FYI I use Dukoff D7, Rovner Versa, and Java Red 2,5
Do you have any tips on how to develop my sound to be more "centered"?
That’s a lot of time on long tones. Honestly - do 30 minutes of long tones, overtones, fun false fingerings and move on. Listen and transcribe and the tone will sort itself out.
 

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I misread the 7 month statement as the length of time for long tones, rather than on saxophone as a whole.

I would not expect great tone after only 7 mos.

But I would not start out on sax with a high baffle .105 tip opening metal mouthpiece, either.
 

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Good morning everyone, I've been practicing saxophone for 7 months, I practice longtone for 1,5-2 hours each day. But still I feel like I dont get that "centered" tone,
So much depends on how you practise long notes as opposed to the amount of time you spend doing them. Just playing long notes with no extra control parameters could possibly be counter productive even. I would also ad that as you are able to diagnose what is wrong with your tone (a good thing) and descrivbe what you want as centred, then tone visualisation exercises will also probably be very fruitful.
 

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Good morning everyone, I've been practicing saxophone for 7 months, I practice longtone for 1,5-2 hours each day. But still I feel like I dont get that "centered" tone, it doesnt have a "body". FYI I use Dukoff D7, Rovner Versa, and Java Red 2,5
Do you have any tips on how to develop my sound to be more "centered"?
Like others have said, I think of "centered" as different than having "body". Do you want a more focused centered tone or do you want a tone with more body? I think of a tone with more body to be richer, have more character, thicker and have more substance. I used to play a Dukoff D7 way back in the day when I first started tenor. I found it bright and powerful but felt it lacked many of those words I used to describe body above. Is that what you are looking for?

If it is indeed "centered", I would suggest practicing with faster air speed. Put your tongue in an "eeeee" position which makes it like a ramp for the air. Also practice playing with about 80% of your air volume. Meaning that playing with 100% is like playing as loud as you can. Back off of that about 20% and practice playing at 80% volume. Many students only practice playing where they are comfortable at like 40% volume and are only used to that. That gives you a timid kind of spread sound. Get used to playing confidently at 80% and it will do wonders for your sound. Obviously, make sure you are supporting your air and breathing correctly (that is a whole other topic that you should research if you don't know anything about it.)

Lastly, I would say try playing into a wall or mirror when you are practicing. I prefer a mirror so I can look at my finger movement. The reason I suggest this is that many times what you hear in the room is your sound bouncing around the room. By the time it gets back to you it can be this spread nebulous tone that you have trouble hearing the center of. If you play into a mirror the tone that bounces back to your ears is more direct and focused. This is the actual sound that is coming out of your bell. If you like that sound and it has focus and center then the sound in the room is actually being diffused by the room.
 

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Like others have said, I think of "centered" as different than having "body". Do you want a more focused centered tone or do you want a tone with more body? I think of a tone with more body to be richer, have more character, thicker and have more substance. I used to play a Dukoff D7 way back in the day when I first started tenor. I found it bright and powerful but felt it lacked many of those words I used to describe body above. Is that what you are looking for?

If it is indeed "centered", I would suggest practicing with faster air speed. Put your tongue in an "eeeee" position which makes it like a ramp for the air. Also practice playing with about 80% of your air volume. Meaning that playing with 100% is like playing as loud as you can. Back off of that about 20% and practice playing at 80% volume. Many students only practice playing where they are comfortable at like 40% volume and are only used to that. That gives you a timid kind of spread sound. Get used to playing confidently at 80% and it will do wonders for your sound. Obviously, make sure you are supporting your air and breathing correctly (that is a whole other topic that you should research if you don't know anything about it.)

Lastly, I would say try playing into a wall or mirror when you are practicing. I prefer a mirror so I can look at my finger movement. The reason I suggest this is that many times what you hear in the room is your sound bouncing around the room. By the time it gets back to you it can be this spread nebulous tone that you have trouble hearing the center of. If you play into a mirror the tone that bounces back to your ears is more direct and focused. This is the actual sound that is coming out of your bell. If you like that sound and it has focus and center then the sound in the room is actually being diffused by the room.
Thats it! What I am looking for is the tone that has "body" . Please give me your tips
This is the video which the tone I really love and would like to achieve
 

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indeed.

Equipment is only a facilitator, your ears and embouchure that you change accordingly are the key to produce any tone.

If Equipment would be the key to sound we would buy this that or the other and sound like this that or the the, but, we don’t!

The video by Don Menza (which I have quoted ad nauseam ) says it all. YOU make the sound


Not only these other videos really show that the player is a large portion of the sound, think centered, work on it. Is THAT simple


Thanks!
 

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Thats it! What I am looking for is the tone that has "body" . Please give me your tips
This is the video which the tone I really love and would like to achieve

I agree that just playing long tones could be a mistake at this point - just reinforcing bad habits.
 

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Thats it! What I am looking for is the tone that has "body" . Please give me your tips
This is the video which the tone I really love and would like to achieve
Read my post above. I would add that that if your tone is too bright and thin then you want to experiment with making your lower lip fatter. Think of your embouchure coming in from the sides not up and down. A fat lower lip is like a big pillow the reed can sit on and it can make the tone fatter if done right. Takes some experimenting with it. I would also suggest learning the song in the video and playing along with the guy. Also try playing the song in your garage or another room that has some reverb. The sound you are hearing on the video sounds like it has some affects on it. You can get the same affect by playing in a room with reverb. Try matching your sound with his. That's the key! I would also say to experiment with the angle that the sax neck is in your mouth. It might be just me but on brighter mouthpieces I find that I tend to lower my strap a little bit so the mouthpiece is a little lower. Something about that angle helps me to make my tone fatter. Not sure what that is but I do it on almost every high baffle mouthpiece I play. Maybe it's all in my head..........
 

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Read my post above. I would add that that if your tone is too bright and thin then you want to experiment with making your lower lip fatter. Think of your embouchure coming in from the sides not up and down. A fat lower lip is like a big pillow the reed can sit on and it can make the tone fatter if done right. Takes some experimenting with it. I would also suggest learning the song in the video and playing along with the guy. Also try playing the song in your garage or another room that has some reverb. The sound you are hearing on the video sounds like it has some affects on it. You can get the same affect by playing in a room with reverb. Try matching your sound with his. That's the key! I would also say to experiment with the angle that the sax neck is in your mouth. It might be just me but on brighter mouthpieces I find that I tend to lower my strap a little bit so the mouthpiece is a little lower. Something about that angle helps me to make my tone fatter. Not sure what that is but I do it on almost every high baffle mouthpiece I play. Maybe it's all in my head..........
Actually, I just thought about it and I think why that angle has that affect is because putting the mouthpiece lower brings the lower lip of the embouchure back a little bit more. This creates a little bit of a subtone affect which makes the tone less brittle and thin.
 

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Blow, straight down the middle, no vibrato,relaxed embouchure-Allard style and visualise a straight line that gets thicker--I'm not joking.
I used to know a guy who practised looooong notes for hours on end-he developed a great sound - full stop. He couldn't put a phrase together,his reading never progressed neither did his technique.
 

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Thats it! What I am looking for is the tone that has "body" . Please give me your tips
This is the video which the tone I really love and would like to achieve
...snip]
This is a nicely done track...

Over the years I have heard a lot of players express frustration that they can make their instrument sound like a favorite recording. I suggest you just work on getting it as close as you can and don't sweat it. This guy has some pro talent behind the scenes helping to create the end result...some of that "body" is added with some tasteful processing.

There's compression, which smooths out the dynamics, and undoubtedly EQ to make it sound like the engineers concept of what a sax should sound like.

I also hear a nice gentle reverb, and maybe what sounds like a 10-20ms single-tap delay hidden in that mix.

A very short delay like that is essentially a perfect copy of the original so close to the original time that (depending on how you mix it) can't really be heard - it just adds depth or "body"

There could be other stuff happening in there to...it's sometimes hard to tell if you're not the one doing the mixing... I would guess they recorded these tracks individually off the board and also had the room mic'd - then they mixed the two together, tweaked it a bit, and then created the finished product.
 

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I've been practicing saxophone for 7 months...
If that means you only started playing 7 months ago, then even if you are a prodigy you have a long ways to go in terms of getting a good sound. All the advice given here is excellent, but it will take time.

I agree the sound on that clip has probably been tweaked quite a bit in the recording process. Nevertheless, the guy had to have a pretty good sound to begin with. But don't expect to get that reverb/delay, etc, in your living room (unless by chance it has perfect acoustics to achieve that).
 
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