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· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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I'm by no means a music notation expert, but if I was answering your question......

Your first example is a "Slide" or a "Glissando". It instructs the performer to begin two or three scale steps below the marked note and "slide" upward—that is, move stepwise diatonically (only using the notes in the key signature you are playing) between the initial and final notes.If there is not a note at the start of the Glissandi, then I believe the amount of "slide" up to the target note is up to the discretion of the player.
Your second example is a "Scoop".
A scoop is a lip slur from about a half-step below into a target note. It's pretty quick and is notated with an ascending curve before the target note. The target notes can be long, short, accented and with marcato.
There are examples all over Google/Youtube/etc.....

Hope this helps.
Respectfully disagree regarding the scoop. The duration and magnitude are not indicated by the notation, so they need to be contextual. If you are playing in an ensemble, such notation should be discussed or demonstrated with consideration for the piece (in a section, players should be listening to the leads). For example, in dance music of the swing era, scoops may be exaggerated as a feature of the tune, whereas more modern pieces may use scoops more lightly. This is one reason why young musicians that are just learning to scoop a note often sound so wrong.
 

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1) Play what's stylistically correct. Don't assume the copyist or arranger had all the subtleties of this notation at hand.

What's the lead alto doing? Do that. Or, are you the lead alto? Then pick something and play it like you mean it.

2) Is this a Billly May chart?
 

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Has there ever been an
"International Conference for the Universal Definition of Articulation Notation and their Execution on different Wind Instruments depending on music style"
?
If not, I'd be in. Preferably in Hawaii, Venice, or Antibes.
 

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Nevertheless I think MuseScore 4.0 will prove to be a useful notation tool with an efficient UI, plausible instrumental sounds, & robust code under the hood. While it'll continue to favor the academic / classical / choral/ early music worlds, not addressing every need of a jazz arranger/composer or songwriter, I'm eagerly anticipating its release. And ya can't beat the price.
I've been using MuseScore for a few years. I've transcribed quite a few songs but am still getting used to the comprehensive array of features. It does have the straight and squiggly gliss marks and there is a difference in how they playback. The best feature is when I have written an Alto piece then want to play it on Tenor, I can just change the instrument for that track and it transposes the entire piece.
My only issue with MuseScore is that if you write several measures before realizing the timing is off or you missed a note, you can't just insert a note and let the remaining measures push right with updated measure marks. The corollary is to go back and delete a note (maybe change it to a grace note) or simply change it's value, the surrounding notes get deleted. The only way I've found to make a change in the middle is to copy all to the right and delete (cnt X), make changes then paste what you cut back in to the right. It works, but gets tedious when you transcribe a lick and realize there were grace notes or just a short gliss instead of individual notes...
I hope 4.x makes editing easier.
 
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