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What is the difference between the straight and curved lines in terms of how these are played? Thanks in advance.
I'm by no means a music notation expert, but if I was answering your question......

Your first example is a "Slide" or a "Glissando". It instructs the performer to begin two or three scale steps below the marked note and "slide" upward—that is, move stepwise diatonically (only using the notes in the key signature you are playing) between the initial and final notes.If there is not a note at the start of the Glissandi, then I believe the amount of "slide" up to the target note is up to the discretion of the player.
Your second example is a "Scoop".
A scoop is a lip slur from about a half-step below into a target note. It's pretty quick and is notated with an ascending curve before the target note. The target notes can be long, short, accented and with marcato.
There are examples all over Google/Youtube/etc.....

Hope this helps.
 

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I'm familiar with the scoop notation (the second one pictured), but not the straight line for a gliss. However, that makes sense. I'd only add that (I think) the gliss could be a chromatic run as well as diatonic. Either would accomplish the end result.

And yes, a scoop is a different effect than a gliss. Listen to Johnny Hodges to hear what a scoop sounds like, for one example.
 

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Yes. Glissando and scoop.
 
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I'd agree that the straight line is a glass and the curved line is a scoop. My guess is that the straight line is due to error or laziness by the editor. The "squiggly" line is most definitely available in the latest Finale (and I assume any of the other good music programs).
 

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Cannonball Vintage Reborn Tenor Sax with Cannonball 5J hr (Meyer clone produced by JJ Babbitt))
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I thought a wavy line played more with keyed notes (rapidly) and the straight line more of a slide for continuous sound rather than keyed notes. A scoop is not as many notes between start and landing.
 

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Yes, it is a portamento. If playing a sax you’d lip up to the note. This notation is more common on strings and trombones.
 

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On my PC rig running Windows 10, MuseScore 3.6.2 (free open-source notation software) using its bundled soundfont does not playback glissandi, scoops, et al in midi.

MuseScore 4.0, now in beta development with all-new, vastly improved sound libraries, does play glissandi & scoops convincingly. After testing it on virtual sax & trombone in some jazz tunes I transcribed, I've gotta say the playback is righteous.

MuseScore's 4.0 beta version is still buggy as the far-flung developers address issues flagged by beta users on github. A date for official release of v4.0 has not yet been announced, & full implementation of midi capabilities may not happen until v4.1 or 4.2.

Nevertheless I think MuseScore 4.0 will prove to be a useful notation tool with an efficient UI, plausible instrumental sounds, & robust code under the hood. While it'll continue to favor the academic / classical / choral/ early music worlds, not addressing every need of a jazz arranger/composer or songwriter, I'm eagerly anticipating its release. And ya can't beat the price.
 
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