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Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys,
one of my dukoff mouthpiece 's table is unbalanced, i believe there is a little bump in the middle . I think the reeds in the picture below explains better than me.
102955

So , my question is, how do i level the table of this kind of bump?
Which number of sand-paper should i use?

thank you guys , any comment is appreciated.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Bent reeds are not indicators of a bad table. Reeds that are not properly managed will take a curve from playing. Definitely do not attempt any mouthpiece repair yourself.
 

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Dont do it if you have to ask. Especially on something important to you. Lowering the table amkes the tip ize smaller. More importantly it changes the facing length and curve.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thank you guys, so what is the solution for that?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
yes, i have been playing 9, and 10 for many years. This is the only mpc i have this problem. I never have such problem with the Theo Wanne's.
Do you play with a large tip opening?
 

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Eventually all reeds will take a set like the picture, from being repeatedly bent over the curve of the mouthpiece facing. Putting them in a reed guard may slow this process but it'll happen anyway.

It's obvious that mouthpieces with bigger openings and those with shorter facings will make this happen faster and more severely.

Play them till they feel too soft; then clip them; if that doesn't help throw them away.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thank you turf3, so you guys agree with don't touch the table right?

Eventually all reeds will take a set like the picture, from being repeatedly bent over the curve of the mouthpiece facing. Putting them in a reed guard may slow this process but it'll happen anyway.

It's obvious that mouthpieces with bigger openings and those with shorter facings will make this happen faster and more severely.

Play them till they feel too soft; then clip them; if that doesn't help throw them away.
 

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If you have doubts about the mouthpiece the easiest, and cheapest, way to fix is it send it to someone who knows what they're doing for an evaluation. Maybe the table is flat, maybe it isnt, maybe the facing is inconsistent, maybe the facing is too long or short, maybe its perfectly fine and the quality of cane for that batch of reeds is bad, who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you have doubts about the mouthpiece the easiest, and cheapest, way to fix is it send it to someone who knows what they're doing for an evaluation. Maybe the table is flat, maybe it isnt, maybe the facing is inconsistent, maybe the facing is too long or short, maybe its perfectly fine and the quality of cane for that batch of reeds is bad, who knows.
right. Thank you guys!
 

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That reed in the foreground (in front) doesn't appear to have the proportions of a normal reed. The vamp is too short compared to the heal. It looks like it has been clipped a few times to extend it's life. If you're doing this you're effectively moving the break point back along the length of the reed and eventually you will get a big arc or camber in a reed like this. Are you clipping or shortening these reeds??
 

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What happens if you put the mouthpiece against a piece of glass?

(Please don’t tell me you don’t have a piece of glass.)
 

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Chances are, if it’s a typical Silverite Dukoff, it’s crooked, that material is so soft and malleable all you have to do is look at it to deform it.
 

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It is often difficult to ascertain if your mouthpiece is being level with you. Mouthpieces are notorious for not telling the truth, so one must be mindful of this lack of candor.
 

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Is this causing any issues with playing? Many mouthpieces don’t have perfectly flat tables or have otherwise imperfect facings but can still play well. Sure you can get it worked on, but if you like the way it plays then you can just try to work with it as it is. One technique I have used on mouthpieces with iffy tables is to soak the reed and allow it to dry on the mouthpieces so it adapts to the table’s form a bit better.
 

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Some mouthpieces are meant to have a level table, and some are designed to have a slightly concave table to seal when the center of the reed swells from moisture absorption. Both kinds of mouthpieces work, so you may not want to have a level table on certain mouthpieces. I ruined an old Vandoren mouthpiece for tenor long ago by trying to make the table flat when it was not designed to be that way. Just play a mouthpiece that works for you, and leave it alone. Reeds you can easily adjust, adjusting a mouthpiece is quite a different matter.
 

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A vandoren or other mpc will always perform just fine or better if the table is flat. However after flattening the table Evenly...not as easy as it sounds. The curve has to be corrected.

That said, the opis using reeds for evidence...not conclusive at all. If we were to use them as evidence we would conclude that the table is convex, not concave. A convex table is somewhat rare compared to concave and a table as convex as his reeds probably would have had him tossing the mouthpiece in the trash long ago.

internet tricks and anecdotal information jut does not cut it. A flat surface, tools and the knowledge of how to use them does. Of course the op is the only one who know if the piece plays well. If it does dont sweat it. If it does not do not ruin the piece.
 

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That reed in the foreground (in front) doesn't appear to have the proportions of a normal reed. The vamp is too short compared to the heal. It looks like it has been clipped a few times to extend it's life. If you're doing this you're effectively moving the break point back along the length of the reed and eventually you will get a big arc or camber in a reed like this. Are you clipping or shortening these reeds??
I was thinking the same thing, maybe just time for a new reed.
 
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