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Discussion Starter #1
my black/gold SX-90 Tenor seems to accumulate a lot of spit (everywhere!). I usually use a little bit of water on a vandoren cleaning cloth,and it seems to do okay. I was thinking that maybe the water might be bad to the finish, and now I seem to notice that the springs for G# and the table keys appear to be rusted. I know tons of spit leaks from the bis-key pad and goes to the table keys, as well as the rods that go down to the bell keys, but is this sometihng I should worry about? Are there any other types of cleaners that work? should my springs be rusting?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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Oops, my bad, I thought maybe you were talking about acid bleed, which looks like rust on the lacquer of the horn. Could that be it? Acid bleed is very common with the JK's.
 

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Just use lacquer polish. Yamaha and Selmer make some. I've owned at least a half dozen JK's and never saw any acid bleed.........
 

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Finnerski said:
http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?t=69004

This is what I'm talking about. Look at the lower right hand keys especially the low C key. I have similar spots on my lacquer JK's. Besides Joe, you haven't held on to one of your JK's long enough to experience any acid bleed!:D

Isn't that from lacquer wear/exposed brass? Acid bleed usually comes from underneath the posts due to soldering problems if I'm not mistaken. I had a new Yani sopranino that had acid bleed right out of the box, so your point about hanging on to them might not be applicable.;)
 

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Joe Jazz said:
Isn't that from lacquer wear/exposed brass? Acid bleed usually comes from underneath the posts due to soldering problems if I'm not mistaken. I had a new Yani sopranino that had acid bleed right out of the box, so your point about hanging on to them might not be applicable.;)
You could very well be right. I don't have my horns with me right now so I can't check out the spots on mine, but if I recall, there is some acid bleed coming out of soldered areas on my bari. The colors are very much the same. Its just kind of unusual that the wear would show up as a rusty color. But I'm certainly no expert on acid bleed, or acid for that matter.
 

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I use a dry micro fiber cloth to wipe off any moisture I find after playing my instruments. Washing my micro fiber cloth from time to time helps clean without smearing.

Every once in a while, I will use a teeny tiny drop of dish washing liquid and dampen my micro fiber cloth to clean any areas of the horn that show spots from prior moisture that dried up. I also use Q-Tips on those hard to reach areas. I'll then dry the horn with a dry micro fiber cloth. The finish looks great after this.

The springs on both my horns appear to be in great shape and don't show any obvious signs of rust.

I've been playing on mouthpieces with baffles for years. I try to blow air through the horn with as little saliva as possible to maximize tone quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
no, it is not acid bleed, just porbably dust and salia running everywhere. My friend actually has the same problem on his ST90-about the saliva "stains". My sax is almost at its one year anniversary(not like it really matters). I do try to stay away from blowing with lots of saliva, but sometimes when you are whalin' there's not much you can do about saliva :)
 
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