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Discussion Starter #1
hi, i've been playing alto(and strictly alto) for a year and i have been working on improvisation (mostly piano voicings) recently, but i really dont know what to do with major and minor scales. for example if the song is in F minor(D major) what would i do with scales? a friend of mine told me that there are many different types of phrasing you can take from major and minor scales? come on cats i know alot of you know a thing or two about improvisation, please share it :D
 

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Just a couple of things. One, I wouldn't put it as improvising "over" major or minor scales. Generally, one may improvise over major or minor chords or a set of chords called "changes". To this note, please feel free to use the search function for looking for these types of tips. Two, F minor is not usually used as a relative to D major. It is generally the reverse (F major/D minor).

That said. There are tons of tips on chord scales, pentatonics, hexatonics, and so on in the Jazz and Improvisation part of this forum (i.e. where this thread is posted). Have at it and enjoy.

PS - you would be wise to find a reputable private teacher to really get this stuff happening.
 

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Adderleysfasthands said:
hi, I've been playing alto(and strictly alto) for a year and i have been working on improvisation (mostly piano voicings) recently, but i really don't know what to do with major and minor scales. for example if the song is in F minor(D major) what would i do with scales? a friend of mine told me that there are many different types of phrasing you can take from major and minor scales? come on cats i know a lot of you know a thing or two about improvisation, please share it :D
You've come to an important point in your development; you know about some scales, but what do you do with them to "make music"? While asaxman's suggestion to buy Levine's book is right on the money for theory, I believe you're looking for something else as well, if I understand your question. You need to become familiar with the jazz vocabulary. You need to internalize this vocabulary and then work it out on the horn by listening to jazz, transcribing solos and then memorizing material, (solos, as well as ii-V7 patterns and other motivic material). You don't have to work out a whole solo at first; listen to a solo that you really connect with and pick out one part to focus on. Anything you can get to, one measure, whatever, and go from there. I believe Dave Liebman has an excellent book out on transcribing solos that you might want to pick up. And you might consider picking up the workbook, "Patterns for Jazz", by Jerry Coker, et al, to help you with the unique approach towards melodic material employed by jazz musicians. And one other thing: get a teacher to help you!......daryl
 

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wersax said:
I believe Dave Liebman has an excellent book out on transcribing solos that you might want to pick up.
it's a DVD:
The Improviser's Guide to Transcription
DVD Video 1 Hour, 38 Minutes for all levels

http://upbeat.com/lieb/Publications_Reviews/caris.htm

never seen the DVD, but I do a lot of transcribing & playing other people's transcriptions and I think it really has helped me.

-A-
 

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Most modern tunes that are in a minor key suit the dorian mode.

So for F minor use a scale built on the Eb major scale, but starting on F.

This is only a rough guide. When the tune modulates to C7 for example,
you may have to modify some of those notes.

Let your ear be the guide to what sounds right (to you).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thank you people, i think i should stop being self taught now, and get a teacher and really just start on with this theory business, not to be vain in anyway, but i believe for playing for a year, i have come far, and i would like to continue with it.

thank you (and where can i buy this theory book)
 

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kavala said:
Most modern tunes that are in a minor key suit the dorian mode.

So for F minor use a scale built on the Eb major scale, but starting on F.

This is only a rough guide. When the tune modulates to C7 for example,
you may have to modify some of those notes.

Let your ear be the guide to what sounds right (to you).
Great advice as ever from Kavala, especially that last bit, which can often be forgotten when you start thinking too hard (in my own experience anyway).
 
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