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Selmer Balanced Action Tenor Saxophone, Powell Flute
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Go right ahead and keep wasting your time and energy on useless long tones, I will be over here working on making MUSIC. The entire woodwind and saxophone world is delusional with this perceived need for a long tones. Just be thankful you're not a brass player because they have no choice if they don't do long tones and lips slurs they will never develop their embouchure.
Revelation ... You can practice long tones and music. Heck you can practice, long tones, over tones, articulation, intonation, technique and music in one session if you practice smart!

You think the saxophone world is delusional with this stuff, but it's coming from world class players that do it themselves!

You don't have to practice them everyday for your entire life, but they are an essential part of saxophone growth.

We're still waiting on you to post a recording of yourself so we can see what practicing just music does.

I vote for Delta City Blues. Let's hear it !

Don't be so negative and spout all this stuff about long tones and overtones being not important. Let's pass along knowledge of being well rounded and practicing smart.

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If you perceive what Getz did as being the "total opposite" of what Coltrane did, you have completely missed the entire point of what both of these masters were doing, which was that each had developed an incredibly intimate connection to their personal sound, which was intimately connected to their stylistic concept on a very deep level, and each had truly figured out how to tap into cosmic energy flow. To me, Getz and Coltrane were doing EXACTLY the same thing each in their own way.

Listen a lot to Getz and then do the total opposite.
 

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Delta City Blues? Yes I am very familiar with it and very much enjoy and appreciate listening to it, and stylistically it might be your thing I don't much interest in developing/copying that particular technique of overblowing the harmonics to that extraordinary degree of mastery which is very much a narrow, particular Brecker niche.

And yes in fact the saxophone world most definitely is delusional and giving itself repeated lobotomies every day with long tones.

And my message is not "negative," in fact it is a message of hope, of freedom, a call for players to emancipate themselves from years and decades of useless, delusional drudgery.
How many times have I read some sort of totally delusional BS about people becoming self actualized, achieving some sort of new Zen enlightenment, becoming one with the universe, etc etc nonsense from long tones? LOLOL its a whole nother level of delusional. But I'm sure lots of kids will continue to pay $60,000 per year in tuition to have some
windbag professor tell them to spend 20, 30 40 minuets per day wasting valuable practice time uselessly blowing long tones.
There is exactly zero need for saxophone players to do "warm ups" whatever that might be or long tones. I advocate doing scales with a metronome and maybe spending 1-2 minutes doing overtones if the spirit strikes you, otherwise get right into being creative and working on your IDEAS, which hopefully integrate all these sort of isolated skills into a unified artistic whole.

Just pick the horn up and start working on what you are doing

Revelation ... You can practice long tones and music. Heck you can practice, long tones, over tonMY es, articulation, intonation, technique and music in one session if you practice smart!

You think the saxophone world is delusional with this stuff, but it's coming from world class players that do it themselves!

You don't have to practice them everyday for your entire life, but they are an essential part of saxophone growth.

We're still waiting on you to post a recording of yourself so we can see what practicing just music does.

I vote for Delta City Blues. Let's hear it !

Don't be so negative and spout all this stuff about long tones and overtones being not important. Let's pass along knowledge of being well rounded and practicing smart.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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Selmer Balanced Action Tenor Saxophone, Powell Flute
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3,661 Posts
Delta City Blues? Yes I am very familiar with it and very much enjoy and appreciate listening to it, and stylistically it might be your thing I don't much interest in developing/copying that particular technique of overblowing the harmonics to that extraordinary degree of mastery which is very much a narrow, particular Brecker niche.

And yes in fact the saxophone world most definitely is delusional and giving itself repeated lobotomies every day with long tones.

And my message is not "negative," in fact it is a message of hope, of freedom, a call for players to emancipate themselves from years and decades of useless, delusional drudgery.
How many times have I read some sort of totally delusional BS about people becoming self actualized, achieving some sort of new Zen enlightenment, becoming one with the universe, etc etc nonsense from long tones? LOLOL its a whole nother level of delusional. But I'm sure lots of kids will continue to pay $60,000 per year in tuition to have some
windbag professor tell them to spend 20, 30 40 minuets per day wasting valuable practice time uselessly blowing long tones.
There is exactly zero need for saxophone players to do "warm ups" whatever that might be or long tones. I advocate doing scales with a metronome and maybe spending 1-2 minutes doing overtones if the spirit strikes you, otherwise get right into being creative and working on your IDEAS, which hopefully integrate all these sort of isolated skills into a unified artistic whole.

Just pick the horn up and start working on what you are doing
Delta City isn't my thing particularly. I'm a Sunny Rollins fanatic. But I still work hard on overtones.

It's funny that you think overblowing / overtones are a Brecker niche thing, when I would associate it with Joe Henderson and Trane much much more.

It's also a Joe Allard thing. Anyone that studied with Allard had to do all of these exercises and the list of heavy weights that studied with him is long.

We can agree to disagree, but your posts are worded in a way that, to me, come across as negative. If you want to send a message of hope that's cool, but bashing something that saxophone players have done for many many years and continue to still do is not a positive way to approach it.

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If my eyes were closed I'd have no problem believing this was Trane .

Along with the ideas he has Trane's timbre and intonational tendencies _on the individual notes_ down cold .


I've also heard Ben switch to Wayne Shorter's timbre and intonation when he was on Wallace Roney's band.
 

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Delta City isn't my thing particularly. I'm a Sunny Rollins fanatic. But I still work hard on overtones.

It's funny that you think overblowing / overtones are a Brecker niche thing, when I would associate it with Joe Henderson and Trane much much more.

It's also a Joe Allard thing. Anyone that studied with Allard had to do all of these exercises and the list of heavy weights that studied with him is long.

We can agree to disagree, but your posts are worded in a way that, to me, come across as negative. If you want to send a message of hope that's cool, but bashing something that saxophone players have done for many many years and continue to still do is not a positive way to approach it.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
Good post from you Simon .

On a sidenote: ask Randy Jones if he thinks you look like a young Mark Tuttle and see what he says .
I'm curious if he's noticed that, yet . :)
 

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Here's the video:
Did anybody else watch the video?

Does the guy in that video really sound like Coltrane? I hear "...hey, I just bought a saxophone and sat in with my buddy's garage band yesterday...."

A lot of varied advice given above. Best of luck finding your sound, which I believe in a few years will not be what it is now.
 

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If my eyes were closed I'd have no problem believing this was Trane .

Along with the ideas he has Trane's timbre and intonational tendencies _on the individual notes_ down cold .


I've also heard Ben switch to Wayne Shorter's timbre and intonation when he was on Wallace Roney's band.
Couldn't agree more! Ben is THE single player I've ever heard come as close to sounding like mid/late 'Trane. I hadn't seen that vid before. Looks like he's playing on a HR.
 

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God that's quite freakish. I'd not have thought it actually possible before seeing this.

If my eyes were closed I'd have no problem believing this was Trane .

Along with the ideas he has Trane's timbre and intonational tendencies _on the individual notes_ down cold .


I've also heard Ben switch to Wayne Shorter's timbre and intonation when he was on Wallace Roney's band.
 

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There are good news and bad news:

The good news: you are a great sounding, highly skilled and committed sax player
The bad news: in order to sound like Coltrane, you would need 1) his jaws 2) his lungs 3) his tongue 4) his teeth and 5) last not least: his brain

Sorry!
 

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I think there is a (sometimes subtle) difference between the actual TONE and the overall sound of a player. IOW, the sound encompasses phrasing, note choice, rhythm, and melody. Both clips posted so far on this thread demonstrate players with a similar concept and overall sound as Trane, but not necessarily his tone. Ben Solomon comes very close and could definitely be mistaken for Coltrane, but I still don't think he has an identical tone. Not sure it's possible to get a tone that is identical to another player who has a unique and identifiable tone quality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
If my eyes were closed I'd have no problem believing this was Trane .

Along with the ideas he has Trane's timbre and intonational tendencies _on the individual notes_ down cold .


I've also heard Ben switch to Wayne Shorter's timbre and intonation when he was on Wallace Roney's band.
Wow!! Thanks for showing me this! This really inspires me, this guy really nailed the mid 60s Coltrane sound.
 
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