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As far as tone I’m really trying to achieve to get a similar tone to that mid 60s Coltrane/Wayne shorter like tone. I know that I can probably achieve a certain tone I want but I am not exactly sure how to approach it. Is it just a matter of continuing to transcribe solos to pick up phrases from them? For instance I know if somebody really dug Stan Getz or Paul Desmond they would aim for that soft airy tone with melodic lines or find a mouthpiece that can help get that tone. Or if someone really digs Dexter Gordon’s playing they would aim for those articulated straightforward bebop lines. But i can’t really pinpoint that mid 60s Coltrane/shorter sound. Does anybody have any possible mouthpiece suggestions? I am currently using a JodyJazz and it is just not working for me. For example there is a video of Leland Whitty of Badbadnotgood and his whole playing style really just screams a love supreme/Crescent Coltrane era. Any thoughts? What are aspects of their playing that should I practice to help get a similar sound? Or as said earlier does anybody have any mouthpiece suggestions. Thanks!

Here’s the video: https://youtu.be/2KAiszHdGH8
 

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First of all you want a smaller tip 5*-6 Otto Link NY STM. Then have it refaced/set up by someone like Norbert Stachel who will clean it up, and brighten it up a drop and put an aggressive facing curve on it to assist in giving that sort of slippery sound Trane gets when playing fast runs. But remember that tons of people play and have played similar Otto Links and they get radically different tones, styles and concepts MOSTLY based on their personal approach and stylistic concept of sculpting sound and playing, not the mp they're playing. Coltrane would've sounded like Coltrane if he tried Stan Getz' or Ben Webster's mouthpiece too.
 

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Link isn't for everybody. Just because Trane played Link doesn't mean you can't sound like him unless you play Link too. I can sound like Trane on my Berg (metal and hard rubber), but have a terrible time on Link. Trane has what I'd describe as a clear, dry sound that you can get with a slightly harder reed and high baffle, and take in a fair amount of mouthpiece.

Then try to play along with his solos. Examine small phrases and sustained notes, listening then trying to copy. Playing in front of a window will reflect the sound, and you'll hear the same thing listeners hear, which is different than what you as a player typically hears. All of the above worked for me and is the template for emulating anyone's sound. With practice, you should be able to get pretty close to whomever you listen to regardless of your equipment.

I don't know what's lacking in your sound now, but I'd try taking in more mouthpiece and a harder reed for a start on your current Jody Jazz. I think a big factor in Trane's sound is where he bites down on the reed. If you experiment taking more and less mouthpiece, you find the sweet spot. Too little, and you get a mellower sound, too much and you get a thin, uncontrolled sound. Just right, you get something close to Trane.

That said, I never really wanted to sound exactly like Trane. My own sound is warmer, fuller and is more pleasant to my ears. But there's no harm in reproducing some elements of his tone and style and incorporating into your individual sound.
 

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Mid 60s Coltrane and Wayne have distinct voices of course, I don't hear a Coltrane/Shorter tone, listen carefully to those guys.
Shorter used a huge tipped Link and Coltrane a small one, they would of course sound like them whatever piece they were playing,the quest for them I think was to find their own voice.
The mouthpiece Coltrane used in the mid 60s, circa A Love Supreme, is probably lying in some London saxophone players mouthpiece draw, unbeknown to them.
Alice Coltrane gave Bheki Mseleku the mouthpiece that Coltrane used on the Love Supreme session. Regrettably someone broke into Bheki's London flat and stole that mouthpiece amongst other items. It may have eventually found its way to a London saxophone player by now...where is it?

The thing is, whoever has that piece almost certainly doesn't sound like Coltrane, listen to Coltrane.
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I agree with the suggestion to try a 6* STM Link. It's funny, but when I was starting out, I wanted nothing more than to sound like Trane. I went down to the music shop and picked out a mouthpiece that looked like the one I saw Trane playing in pictures. I had no idea what size tip opening he used, didn't know anything about any of that. But I got a use 6* Link, and some 3.5 Rico reeds, and I went for it. Started playing with records, trying to steal licks. Working on a lot of pentatonic ideas. And I'll be darned if, after a while, it didn't start sound a little bit Trane-like. Enough so that people sometimes commented on that, which was music to my ears.

Eventually I moved on and tried to develop my own sound. Probably you will, too. But in the meantime you can learn a lot imitating Trane and other greats.
 

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For me, I found that trying to adopt (not necessarily imitate, though) the sound of another sax player (for me it was Dexter) was more about articulation, phrasing used of vibrato, breath, etc. than equipment or set-up. I would suggest taking some key phrases that you like the sound of and listen to them a lot, then try playing along with them with the goal of duplicating as close as you can all of the things that go into producing a tone (again, phrasing articulation, breathing vibrato, etc). And then eventually you might get to where I and a few of the above posters did and abandon that quest and just dig and try to improve on your own unique sound.

Another way to think about it is, you may want to try to adopt someone's "conception" but not necessarily their exact sound. Transcribe, analyze and learn their solos. That will probably get you a long way to your goal.
 

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As far as tone I’m really trying to achieve to get a similar tone to that mid 60s Coltrane/Wayne shorter like tone. I know that I can probably achieve a certain tone I want but I am not exactly sure how to approach it...

Is it just a matter of continuing to transcribe solos to pick up phrases from them? For instance I know if somebody really dug Stan Getz or Paul Desmond they would aim for that soft airy tone with melodic lines or find a mouthpiece that can help get that tone. Or if someone really digs Dexter Gordon’s playing they would aim for those articulated straightforward bebop lines. But i can’t really pinpoint that mid 60s Coltrane/shorter sound... What are aspects of their playing that should I practice to help get a similar sound?
You are aware of the difference of tone and sound, and they are indeed distinct characteristics. Tone is a product of airstream (embouchure, air support, reed/mouthpiece), whereas sound is a product - as you observe - of choice of line, articulation, time, dynamics, etc.

Both will benefit from deep listening, neither is wholly gear-dependent.

Enjoy the Path, and don't be surprised if, along the way, you evolve your own sound.
 

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2 minutes of overtones per day max is all thats needed.

And long tones are about the worst thing to kill a student's interest and creativity. I personally hate them with a passion, they are absolutely useless for woodwind players, and absolutely vital for brass players. I have spoken to many people who have spent tens of thousands of dollars per year to attend jazz programs in major universities, and the professors scam and manipulate these poor slobs into doing absolutely useless overtones for hours per week. Emancipate yourself from this puritanical stupidity. Just be sure to work on your scales diligently with a metronome and you will be good to go.

Hours and hours of overtones. Look at Liebmans book developing a personal sound K
 

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that's not an answer to the question. Everybody has the right to sound like whatever they want to. Ever heard of Sonny Stitt? He, like 1,000 other great saxophonists, started from the point of view of sounding like someone else.
Oh, but it is an answer. It's one you apparently don't like. Good.
 

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2 minutes of overtones per day max is all thats needed.
How'd you come up with that magical number?

You need more than 2 minutes a day. You also don't need to spend an hour a day on it either.

As with most things in life, it's balancing it and recognizing what you are trying to achieve.

Same with long tones. Holding a note to just hold a note is pointless. But crafting a long time from air to sound back to air and contouring a beautiful arch of sound is incredibly hard to do and can be very beneficial in gaining control.

As with everything, you have to dig deeper and know why you are doing it and what the point is. These exercises are hugely beneficial in learning tonal mastery and manipulation, but you have to work at them the right way.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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Why not, it's easy to be / sound like yourself, you have no choice in the matter. Much harder to emulate greatness and add to who you are through the process.

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Oh damn, yeah, that's what I've done wrong all along. Silly me, trying to be proficient on my instrument when I should have been trying to emulate one of the great's sound all this time. What was I thinking? Oh well, I can correct this. Time to buy a multitude of mouthpieces trying to sound like my idols. Nothing like a good rabbit hole I always say.
 

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