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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
on this forum, i read that e.g for the S1, it can be either 440Hz or 442Hz tuned.
How can one recognize or determine whether an S1 has either been tuned for either of these 2 tunings pls?
Is that as a marking or engraving on the horn or is that serial nr related?
thanks
luc
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
i came across the following info
"if there is an "A" after the serial number, the horn is an American model, A=440hz -- and American models were (and are) available by special order only. If there is an "E" or NO LETTER, the horn is a European model, A=442hz".

If it is 442Hz tuned, does this indicate that all tones are off by 2Hz or is there a linear increasing deviation going to upper registers ?
 

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if it is an A= 442 there would be a uniform distribution of this throughout the horn, but the “ problem “ is purely academic at best , the difference (in a playing situation) is barely audible.

But not at the SDA Series.

Have read this about the S1 which schould be high Pitched to 442 if they right.

My two older S1 are definitive not 442 HZ and the newest one could be.
It wasn´t adjustet by myselfe like the other nine Buffet´s in my Collection.
Checking Tuning with 440 wasn´t poorer than other Vintage Horns out of that Time.
Buffet was know for good Intonation and they are as good as Selmer or SML, if the Horn was right adjusted.
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on this forum, i read that e.g for the S1, it can be either 440Hz or 442Hz tuned.
How can one recognize or determine whether an S1 has either been tuned for either of these 2 tunings pls?
Is that as a marking or engraving on the horn or is that serial nr related?
thanks
luc
Look for markings inside the neck
 

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I have to question how much this matters in practice.

I was surprised that I can actually hear this change happen in this video (headphones recommended). The actual difference is far less than many things I do, even in a classical context, to apply shading/nuance to my sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6m1A3gBQOt4

My two cents: I don't think it's worth worrying over.

Alan
 

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I have to question how much this matters in practice.

I was surprised that I can actually hear this change happen in this video (headphones recommended). The actual difference is far less than many things I do, even in a classical context, to apply shading/nuance to my sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6m1A3gBQOt4

My two cents: I don't think it's worth worrying over.

Alan
Thanks for posting this ! It changes, but in order for me to notice it I had to bring the volume all the way up on both the vid and my laptop. When the vol settings were my 'normal', I could not tell the difference...even at full volume, it almost seemed more like the overtones changed as opposed to the actual root pitch.
 

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any vibrato you do is certaonly shifting the sound more than the 2hz. difference
 

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i came across the following info
"if there is an "A" after the serial number, the horn is an American model, A=440hz -- and American models were (and are) available by special order only. If there is an "E" or NO LETTER, the horn is a European model, A=442hz".

If it is 442Hz tuned, does this indicate that all tones are off by 2Hz or is there a linear increasing deviation going to upper registers ?
Yes, the letter after the serial nr determins if it’s tuned to 442 (no letter or an E) or 440 (an A after the serial). But I have never understood why Buffet ever bothered with the american models. Selmer and Yamaha only makes 442Hz horns and it's no problem to use them in 440Hz settings...
 

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if it is an A= 442 there would be a uniform distribution of this throughout the horn, but the “ problem “ is purely academic at best , the difference (in a playing situation) is barely audible.





Look for markings inside the neck
Thanks for this Milandro,

I remember seeing markings on the inside of the neck of the 1973/74 SDA/S1 Alto that I own. It has " 82 DL " inscribed in the neck, 82 are the last two digits of the serial number. D L , who knows?

Regards

Peter.
 

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my pleasure, another place where markings could be is under the cork
 

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The piano tuner in France detunes the piano to make pitch more stable - to around 436. It got me wondering, how many pianos in jazz clubs and small venues would tune to something less than 440 or 442, and therefore how many gigs are likely to end up pitched slightly differently?
 

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any vibrato you do is certaonly shifting the sound more than the 2hz. difference
That 2hz is about 8 cents, which is pretty significant. A non musician will easily hear the waves of 2 simultaneous pitches that are differing 8 cents. I agree that saxes are pretty flexible though. With clarinets I've definitely wished I had something designed for 442, especially when playing in an orchestra tuned to 443. But maybe if you have a sax designed for 442 (yamaha?) and it is a hot day and you are playing with a keyboard at 440, you would be better off with a lower pitched sax.
 

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if that were the case Yamaha saxophones ( and other instruments all built in 442Hz) couldn’t be used to play with other instruments.

This discussion has been going on for years , all the while people play a mix of 442 and 440 instruments

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...g-reference-pitch-standard-A-440-Hz-or-442-Hz

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?69914-Possible-to-play-A442-in-A440-Groups/page2

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?44825-A-440-vs-A-442

and many more threads...
 

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The piano tuner in France detunes the piano to make pitch more stable - to around 436. It got me wondering, how many pianos in jazz clubs and small venues would tune to something less than 440 or 442, and therefore how many gigs are likely to end up pitched slightly differently?
Close enough for jazz... ;)

Hopefully are going to pull out the mouthpiece some so you do not play 8 cents sharp. Then listen and adjust with your embouchure as needed as with all saxes playing with other musicians.
 

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Close enough for jazz... ;)

Hopefully are going to pull out the mouthpiece some so you do not play 8 cents sharp. Then listen and adjust with your embouchure as needed as with all saxes playing with other musicians.
For sure when practising, but I'm presuming on stage where there's a keyboard, players will just tune to the piano, or maybe to a double bass? Then the tuning will be whatever it is, and who's to know?
 

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My S2 is European tuned. Push on a tiny bit more. Tiny bit. As the 4 Buffets I had theory all got great build in intonation. And that Buffet tone.
 
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