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OK, try 0000 steel wool.

Frankly, as long as it's not making your hands green, you can just ignore it. That's what I do with most minor discolorations on my instruments. If I were to set about keeping beautiful two altos two tenors a baritone a bass sax three sopranos, two flutes a piccolo a clarinet a double-bass four guitars a Fender bass three amplifiers a portable reed organ a ukulele and an upright piano, I would not have time even to sleep and eat never mind earning a living or practicing music.
 

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you can ignore it and eventually end up with a crater at every spot that has it or you can remove it and not let it come back.
Yeah, well, I'm 58 and if I live to 90 and am able to play till then that'll be 32 more years; I've been playing about 42 years and haven't had corrosion penetrate the wall of a saxophone yet, so I'm not real worried. If I ever have a saxophone get a hole due to corrosion, I'll just solder the hole shut and keep going. Adrian Rollini had a corrosion hole at the RH thumb rest of his bass saxophone. He just soldered a silver dollar over it and went to the next gig.
 

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Well, just like silver plate tarnishing to grey, I just DON'T CARE.

Let it turn green and call it patina. There, solved that for you, minimum effort required. It would be a much better use of time to spend the time you're going to spend to keep your horn free of verdigris, red corrosion, finger prints, water spots, dust, etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., and spend a small fraction of it oiling the mechanism and the rest of it practicing.

If you didn't want the brass to corrode, why did you buy an unlacquered horn?
 
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