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Just keep your horn dry and they’ll never develop.
I always keep my case open after playing, usually overnight, before shutting it closed next morning. Green oxidation became a thing of the past ever since I adopted this routine years ago.
 

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Still rub them off with a paper towel or better get yourself a role of bamboo towels or a washable dust cloth. Silver polish will help (or TarnX), Flitz, Mother's Mag (for polishing magnesium and aluminum wheels) works great and it non-abrasive. Any jewelry polish should also work but there must be 50 threads on this forum alone on what to do and what not.
 

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Paper towels hasn't worked on my horn. I tried a soft nylon brush but that didn't work either, so will next try a brass brush. The oxydation's in small hidden spots, and the horn hasn't much lacquer left anyway).

I don't eat ketchup. Would Sriracha or Worcester sauce work?
 

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Toothpaste on a Q-tip, bit of flannel, microfiber cloth, whatever is handy.
Cleans, won't scratch, and leaves your horn smelling minty fresh. 😉
 

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Noted, thanks Guto. I'll start with Q-tips and toothpaste, as bandmommy recommends. Though really, brass on bare brass might not scratch too much.
 

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.. and really, only store the sax dry and you'll never have to deal with it again. even a tiny bit of moisture in a closed case for a few days in a row will bring all oxidation back again.
 

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Yeah, myself, I'm very careful with my horns: I always use pad savers, swabs, and chamois after each play session, always let them air out on the stand, and only rarely store them in the cases.

But it can get extremely humid around these parts. The green oxydation's quite limited, mostly in hard-to-clean places.
 

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OK, try 0000 steel wool.

Frankly, as long as it's not making your hands green, you can just ignore it. That's what I do with most minor discolorations on my instruments. If I were to set about keeping beautiful two altos two tenors a baritone a bass sax three sopranos, two flutes a piccolo a clarinet a double-bass four guitars a Fender bass three amplifiers a portable reed organ a ukulele and an upright piano, I would not have time even to sleep and eat never mind earning a living or practicing music.
 

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Years ago I repadded a Low A Mark VI 5 digit bari fpr a notable world class local. It had that green crap all over it. Almost waxy. To the point where I could scrape it off with my fingernail. It was disgusting.

Ultrasonic wouldn't touch it, nor would alcohol. The only thing that would take it off was toulene (contact cement thinner). Toulene is indeed toxic, so it was a rubber glove and vent fan on high event, then wash all parts off with soap and water after, but all the green crap did easily come off.
 

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OK, try 0000 steel wool.

Frankly, as long as it's not making your hands green, you can just ignore it. That's what I do with most minor discolorations on my instruments. If I were to set about keeping beautiful two altos two tenors a baritone a bass sax three sopranos, two flutes a piccolo a clarinet a double-bass four guitars a Fender bass three amplifiers a portable reed organ a ukulele and an upright piano, I would not have time even to sleep and eat never mind earning a living or practicing music.
you can ignore it and eventually end up with a crater at every spot that has it or you can remove it and not let it come back.
 

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you can ignore it and eventually end up with a crater at every spot that has it or you can remove it and not let it come back.
Yeah, well, I'm 58 and if I live to 90 and am able to play till then that'll be 32 more years; I've been playing about 42 years and haven't had corrosion penetrate the wall of a saxophone yet, so I'm not real worried. If I ever have a saxophone get a hole due to corrosion, I'll just solder the hole shut and keep going. Adrian Rollini had a corrosion hole at the RH thumb rest of his bass saxophone. He just soldered a silver dollar over it and went to the next gig.
 
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