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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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Discussion Starter #1
I was recently asked online how I align trumpet pistons in there chambers correctly, radially and axially,

I was curious if Im just blowing air by openly discussing this or whether some people are interested

So before I delve to deep, I guess Ill just talk and ask others how they inspect for alignment

For the No 2 valve its pretty easy, you can see visually in the depressed position the piston should line up with the open ports with the slide removed. However in the raised position its more difficult and the same applies for No 1 and 3

I have a few fancy gadgets for inspecting down through the tubes for alignement, I was curious what others use for setting piston heights and orientation
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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Discussion Starter #2
Sorry had to exit out of windows explorer and restart in firefox to be able to upload the picture

One of my fancy inspection tools, this picture is currently showing the corrosion on the inner slide, I use this all the way up the tube to look at the actual orientation

Votaw makes one for your eye, nice unit but very limiting, this one allows me to take photos etc..
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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Discussion Starter #4
I bought a commercial equivelant of your tool paul from allied I think, almost identical.

Becuase I replate and remachine my own trumpet pistons, and Ive mentioned it here on the forum I got an enquiry on piston alignement from a member, so decided I might do a tutorial. No interest was shown so I just left the topic alone..
 

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I use a modified (had to cut down the edges to fit the cylinders and bend the head angle a bit) dental mirror to look into the ports from adjacent cylinders for port alignment where I can't observe directly through the tubing, (some "valve depressed" position valves depending on the angles the tuning slide tubing enters the valve block, the vast majority of "up position" valves- the through block Courtois models and tuning bell horns being the exceptions). An led inspection light on a flex neck helps with the illumination.

I sprang for a fiber optic borescope and found that it, in practice, was no better that the mirror- although it had a lesser learning curve. The borescope IS useful for looking for interior solder blobs, ETC, though.
 

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though I believe in the concept of valve realignment...i have quite a few OLD horns that have never been done and they play just fine....if i were to pay the money to have the job done i would ONLY use synthetic (rubber)felts as i believe the reason for the alignment would be negated quite soon after the felts became damp and compressed again.
 
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