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Discussion Starter #1
I can bring them down to maybe mf or mp but as soon as I try to play any softer I can't keep them stable, starting on the 3rd overtone of the series and up. Is it a normal tendency of higher overtones needing more power? If not what can I do to improve?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Do you arch your tongue on the higher ones?
I find this allows me to control the dynamics on all the overtones.
 

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You should be able to do them pretty soft...virtually as soft as you can play the regular fingerings.. Just keep doing them, that's the idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Do you arch your tongue on the higher ones?
I find this allows me to control the dynamics on all the overtones.
Yeah I do but I'm also fighting bad habits of closing the throat / biting too much.

virtually as soft as you can play the regular fingerings
:shock: Man do I have some work ahead of me... Great!

Thanks guys!
 

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I urge my students to practice them at p-pp dynamic levels, in order to develop control, rather than muscling them through volume or jaw pressure. Even better, practice them with a very loose double-lip embouchure, at very soft dynamic levels, and the only option available to you will be the development of oral cavity size and configuration control.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I urge my students to practice them at p-pp dynamic levels, in order to develop control, rather than muscling them through volume or jaw pressure. Even better, practice them with a very loose double-lip embouchure, at very soft dynamic levels, and the only option available to you will be the development of oral cavity size and configuration control.
Nice , that's what I was looking for. I know this type of exercise is probably going to be tough but I've been playing a lot of soft long tones recently and it seemed it helped me be more aware of what's going on inside my oral cavity. Thank you!
 

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like those exercises that go ppp<fff>ppp... if you believe you are playing them too loud, over the course of a week/month, work at reducing the volume required to produce that sound.

when you tongue a note it is easier than breathing into the horn to make the same sound come out (the difference between a jet-aeroplane on an aircraft carrier, or a seaplane on a lake somewhere at take-off). the same is probably for dynamics, at the start it's just a good thing that the pitch you wanted to sound, did. Don't worry too much about the dynamics because it is a good thing you are sounding that partial, you have to learn how to crawl before you can walk.

It's a bit of a see-saw however playing really quite requires more 'overall' control. The effectiveness of how you produce a note is amplified at these soft dynamics, quickly the note can become really wavy, or stop completley, or not even start... i think for the first time ever i just tried tonguing the partials, that's a little more difficult (as these are exercises in throat control), it's easier and probably better to 'breath' into the horn and the sound come out.

lol - just another $0.02 from the brain of tris.
 

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Nice , that's what I was looking for. I know this type of exercise is probably going to be tough but I've been playing a lot of soft long tones recently and it seemed it helped me be more aware of what's going on inside my oral cavity. Thank you!
Mpc practise would also help you, scales and long notes pp < ff > pp keeping the pitch as level and in as much control as you can
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I urge my students to practice them at p-pp dynamic levels, in order to develop control, rather than muscling them through volume or jaw pressure. Even better, practice them with a very loose double-lip embouchure, at very soft dynamic levels, and the only option available to you will be the development of oral cavity size and configuration control.
HAHAHAHA!!!! Man, this is awesome! Talk about instant gratification. This is a fantasticulous exercise! It's already made me realize / discover quite a few things I can apply not only to overtones but to regular playing. Millions of thanks Jim!

like those exercises that go ppp<fff>ppp... if you believe you are playing them too loud, over the course of a week/month, work at reducing the volume required to produce that sound.

when you tongue a note it is easier than breathing into the horn to make the same sound come out (the difference between a jet-aeroplane on an aircraft carrier, or a seaplane on a lake somewhere at take-off). the same is probably for dynamics, at the start it's just a good thing that the pitch you wanted to sound, did. Don't worry too much about the dynamics because it is a good thing you are sounding that partial, you have to learn how to crawl before you can walk.

It's a bit of a see-saw however playing really quite requires more 'overall' control. The effectiveness of how you produce a note is amplified at these soft dynamics, quickly the note can become really wavy, or stop completley, or not even start... i think for the first time ever i just tried tonguing the partials, that's a little more difficult (as these are exercises in throat control), it's easier and probably better to 'breath' into the horn and the sound come out.

lol - just another $0.02 from the brain of tris.
Well I can play pretty much up to anywhere I want but it's totally out of control because I've been using my jaw to help me get there. However I find it harder to tongue the notes than attack them with air. Hmmm... More to work on.

Mpc practise would also help you, scales and long notes pp < ff > pp keeping the pitch as level and in as much control as you can
I know, I know but it's a real torture. :mrgreen:
 

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How soft should you play overtones, Victor? In your case, as softly as humanly possible. :twisted:

But seriously, saxophomores: Excellent ideas in this thread. Tried some earlier. Not much success at all but will try again.
 
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