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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #1
A friend of mine is selling a Selmer Tenor MarkVII built in 1978 ( accordying to serial number ( 280827 )...How much could be a good price to buy it ? It has been reviewed by a technician and adjusted ... i am enclosing some pictures ...is the Mark VII as good as a Mark VI?
Should I buy it or stay with recently bought ( almost new) Yamaha YTS-275 ? I know that the 275 is an student sax...
I can not play test it right now because I am in another country , and he needs to sell it now... he is a close friend of mine and I would like to buy that saxophone ... But the market for that kind of instruments is very limited in our country ( Venezuela) and is difficult to get a very
good price for it....
How much money ( in dollars ) could be a good price for me ?
I appreciate your opinions
 

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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #2
More pictures:
 

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In the US $2000-3000 pending on condition. Your friend's sax looks great. Excellent saxophones if you can get around the bias against them for being different from MKVI. There are a few top tier professionals who have played them for a very long time.
 

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In the US $2000-3000 pending on condition. Your friend's sax looks great. Excellent saxophones if you can get around the bias against them for being different from MKVI. There are a few top tier professionals who have played them for a very long time.
I agree with everything here.
 

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In the last few months prices have gone up for these, or so it seems in as much as the asking prices have gone up.

I have had 3 only one as nice as yours and they sold for €2000 , now they are asking about €2500
 

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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #6
could it be considered a "vintage"sax, as it is 40 years old ?
The pads were replaced 2 years ago with original Selmer pads...
 

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could it be considered a "vintage"sax, as it is 40 years old ?
The pads were replaced 2 years ago with original Selmer pads...
Are they trying to get more money for it because it is "vintage"? If so, then I'd say "No, it's just old."

"Old" as you know, is a matter of perspective. If one is 17 years old, then anything greater than 25 years old might seem archaic. :bluewink:
 

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consider it anything you want!

It is not that you need a stamp on it.

It meets MY criteria for being defined vintage

1) It is no longer in production
2) it is older than 30 years

 

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I suppose there are a lot of things that could be considered "vintage" by merely applying the basic rule. But with saxophones, I'd think that design features should be considered when deciding whether or not a saxophone is "vintage." In MY view, a Selmer Mark VII is not vintage, regardless of its age. It looks a lot like a Balanced Action (a modern design), SBA, MkVI, SA80, SA80II, etc., etc.

Not much has changed in larger saxophones' design since the introduction of the Balanced Action in 1936. DAVE
 

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The “ modern" BA was released in 1935 or 36 in a few years time will be 100 years old ...

I suppose this things are a matter of perspective like octuagenarians calling themselves “ guys" :whistle:
 

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...like octuagenarians calling themselves “ guys" :whistle:
They are. According to Webster, it just means man, fellow, person, in plural referring to both genders. Octogenarians are guys with good genes that are successful in terms of longevity.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Excellent saxophones if you can get around the bias against them for being different from MKVI.
I don't see that as a bad thing necessarily, however I never got on with MKVII (tenors) due to the ergonomics. But also there's a bias against the later MKVIs anyway. Ypou can get anyone to say about any horn "they don't make them like they used too..." (sounds best in shaky old timer voice)
 

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I got a ‘70s vintage Mark VII tenor in October. Horn was a Paul Maslin setup (bought Directly from PM Woodwind in Chicago). In great condition. However, it was a re-lacquer, not original lacquer. I think my wife paid between $2,200 and $2,500. (Birthday gift). Hard pressed to find anyone who can command a higher price than PM. He is also a very talented horn mechanic, and worth every dime. Based on this information, I encourage you to consider.

1). If it has been re-lacquered, $2,200 is the high end of what you should consider paying. If it is the original lacquer, I suppose it could be worth $3,000
2). Horn is definitely not a Mark VI. Values are not comparable.
3) If you have small hands and like to play low B-flat, you might want to consider a different horn. The low B-flat key is a challenge on the Mark VII. Other than that key, The ergonomics are solid for me.
4). It is not vintage. It is a modern design horn. It is not nearly as sturdy as a Mark VI or SBA that preceded it. It is not as sturdy as any of the other vintage horns I have played.
5). It likes modern mouthpieces.
6). I picked out the Mark VII because of the ergonomics and my ability to stay in tune with it. I wasn’t so impressed with the sound. It was fine. However, after I started putting different mouthpieces on it, I learned that the Mark VII is very responsive to different mouthpiece designs. (Jazz to classical - though it definitely has a classical bent). On my SBA and Conn, I find the tone/sound quality to be much more defined by the horn than the mouthpiece. Those two horns kind of stick me in a specific genre of music. The Mark VII is much more flexible.

The Mark VII is my primary instrument. My SBA is for sale. Love the amazing sound of the Conn, but hard to play. People think I’m crazy.. oh well.

Only other word of caution is that ‘new pads,’ does not mean well aligned. If there are air leaks on it, you are going to have to spend a few hundred dollars to get it into great shape. Only way to find out is to play it.

Problem with doing business with friends is that if the horn turns out to be a dog after 3-month. You can get upset at the friend.
 

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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #14
1) Original Lacquer...3) I do not consider my hands small..I am 1.76 mts tall...with long fingers. I was thinking that the sax had the original pads...I don not know the technician that changed the pads, but .... I decided to keep my Yamaha YTS-275 and , instead..... buy a new Soprano ( could it be a Taishan, or Antigua or some other Taiwanese or Chinese with good quality ) to replace my Gulf Instruments Mark soprano that i bought in China, made in the Jiashan factory from Gulf Musical Instruments , paying $350, in May 2011... 7 years ago... The manufacturing expertise and quality of the new saxes produced by companies like Antigua or Taishan must be improved a lot since 2011....
My friend has another offer paying him more or less US $2.400...I could get a new Soprano in 650-700 dollars , and save some money...
Thanks a lot for your comments and advice..
 

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If you have very small hands buy an alto.
You don’t need big mits to play a MKVII.
You just need the good sense to realise that these can be amazing horns that should not be dismissed due to the rubbish spread about them by those who likely have never played one.
I’d urge you to give it a good play test and make your decision based on that.
All the best with your decision.
 

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That MKVII looks in very good condition - you won't find many like that at a good price.
You should buy it - its an underrated excellent pro horn and will play and sound better than your student Yamaha YTS-25.
I have one made in 1978 as well. I have just average size hands but don't have any problem with the ergos of the MKVII, and I love the sound with my stainless steel Berg Larson 120/0 offset M mouthpiece.

There is no urgency for the soprano - you can buy one anytime.
 

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Ho Ho steal it now..don't be fooled the VII's are great horns.
 

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contrary to legends spread by the internet the Mark VII players appear to be normal people , the VII is a great horn playing classical rock or jazz

Look at this player does he look like he has enormous hands? It’s a VII. (good close ups of hands and the bits that supposedly require large hands)

 

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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Discussion Starter #20
how can I convince my wife that I "need" to buy that saxophone, and then I sell the Yamaha to compensate for the money spent ?
Do you have any magical formula to convince wives ?
It is in a very good condition. My friend is a pianist that also play Clarinet and Tenor sax, but he mostly played the piano. I am going to try to find arguments to explain my wife that it is an investment and not another "toy"...
wish me luck..
 
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