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Discussion Starter #1
I know this is an age old debate with saxophones, but here goes anyways.

I just purchased a 18xxxJ silver tenor and after playing it for a few days, i’m wondering how tenors with the other finishes play, particularly the pearl silver. This horn can get a dark sound at low volumes but can get pretty strident at louder volumes. Do the other finishes do the same thing?

I am absolutely loving this horn. I traded my Selmer Series III in to buy it. I brought the Selmer with me to trade in so I was able to play them back to back. I always thought my Selmer had a fat sound but it sounded thin compared to the Borgani. I have happily been assimilated!

Also, I bought the horn from Junkdude. He was great to deal with and I thought gave me a good deal on my trade.
 

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No, but I do like the looks of many of them, such as in my signature. Not a fan of the Black Nickel though, especially when they get older with all the scratches.



Also all those cheap Green/ Pink/ Blue/ etc.
Saxes are ugly.
 

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And how many here have even played a Borgani, much less in the different finishes???
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So according to the article in order to find out what my horn actually sounds like I have to record it? What kind of devilry is this?
 

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Upon reading Kessler's explanation I was disappointed by the fact that no comparison's were made with the subjects blindfolded with the test administrator handing them the instruments in a random order. Acoustic science seems to support the finding that there is no difference in the sound emitted by the saxophone based upon its finish. However claiming that the "sound" is different behind the saxophone actually contradicts the science. It would be far more accurate in my opinion to state that the player's perception of the sound changes from one finish to the next. There is a significant difference between the harmonic spectrum of the sound emitted into the room, and the player's perception of the sound which also includes the bioacoustic feedback as well as the sound waves picked up by the player's ears. Only through "bind testing" can the accuracy and validity of player's perceptions of the sound be studied and analyzed.
 

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So, what is the finish on the inside of these horns? Isn't that where all the sound action is?
 

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As far as the finish, that is any coating on the horn to protect the brass or silver, there would be next to no difference in any kind of lacquer or paint on the sax. With that finish removed, the sax might be more resonant but will still sound the same although it may be more responsive to the player. These differences are on the level of nuances, not 'night and day', but if you string together enough small improvements they can have a cumulative effect.
The material the instrument is made of and its condition, as in 'work hardened' or 'annealed', will definitely affect its playing characteristics. On the tenor sax the larger-volume neck with its double curve is particularly affected by the shape and material. The other necks are too small and straight to get much benefit from different materials but its not impossible.
I believe these differences will be more apparent to the player as better playing than to a listener as a change in tone, although experienced sax players will be able to hear the differences. I can show you the difference in a Sterling silver neck and a brass neck of the same type by the same manufacturer. You will also hear the difference if I just change a ligature.
When it comes the saxes with different materials in the body, bow and bell (any combination) the only meaningful comparison would be to a sax of the same model with all brass but since they are different horns it may not be conclusive.
Now we have plating to consider. Plating may be done over a polished or blasted finish or some combination of the two, but either way the plating, being a metal, becomes part of the wall thickness, so the various tubes are thicker than the plain brass horn, particularly with gold plating because it requires a substrate such as nickel or silver for the gold to bond. Then plating is typically clear-coated for protection from tarnish just like a lacquered sax, which must act as a bit of an insulating blanket. Again, direct comparisons are not really feasible because you would be playing two different saxes. You would simply have to play the horns in question and decide if the extra expense is worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The other thing I take away from the article is that none of us actually know what our horns sound like.
 

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The other thing I take away from the article is that none of us actually know what our horns sound like.
A good quality recording can help, but every time I record myself my first thought is "is that what I really sound like"?
 

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The finish doen’t not AFFECT the sound
 

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My path has also included a Serie III - although I spent several years with a Ref 36 before discovering Borgani tenors. I’ve been on Borganis 15 years or so. Yeah, these horns have some girth!

Yes, they can change their character with volume. That’s one of the things that I really like about them. If you find them overly “strident”, I suggest two things for starters. 1). Be aware of your airflow - if your throat is closing up as you play loud and high, that will have a affect on your tone. 2). Reconsider your choice of mouthpiece - a little baffle goes a long way on these.

Since this thread has already had such an outpouring from the people that haven’t played Borganis, I’ll not challenge their faith with my experience. Feel free to contact me via PM.

Regards,

George

I know this is an age old debate with saxophones, but here goes anyways.

I just purchased a 18xxxJ silver tenor and after playing it for a few days, i’m wondering how tenors with the other finishes play, particularly the pearl silver. This horn can get a dark sound at low volumes but can get pretty strident at louder volumes. Do the other finishes do the same thing?

I am absolutely loving this horn. I traded my Selmer Series III in to buy it. I brought the Selmer with me to trade in so I was able to play them back to back. I always thought my Selmer had a fat sound but it sounded thin compared to the Borgani. I have happily been assimilated!

Also, I bought the horn from Junkdude. He was great to deal with and I thought gave me a good deal on my trade.
 
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