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Hard to generalize but I’d say somewhere between -30 and -50%.

Difference in playability should be close to none IMO, unless it’s been heavily buffed to the point of physical damage.
 

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Percentage, I don't know. But it's a pretty big drop
 

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You gonna play it or use it as an 'investment'?
That thin layer of shiny doesn't make a danged bit of difference if all you want is a solid playing horn.
 

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It may depend on the buyer’s needs, the reputation and desirability of the individual saxophone involved, and what the seller is willing to accept in payment. Meaning, there are many variables in selling any saxophone, including re-lacqs and that any claimed percentage of loss is just opinion and nothing else. DAVE
 

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The main difference would be on a valuable vintage collectible saxophone, like a mark six or a super 20. Getting a newer player-type horn re-lacquered would not make much difference at all.
 

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I think the issue is basic economics. Supply and demand. Some older vintage horns are worth more when they have nice original lacquer because there are not that many around. The cost for a relacquer usually makes it not worth the expense, and then there are not many people looking for a relacquered horn. It would not be unusual to pay about 2K to have a horn overhauled and relacquered (alto). Pretty hard to get that back. Even when done the right way you lose the demand side as many believe the relacquer takes away from the original performance as well as removing the nostalgia of the horn. It appears to be a loss in most aspects.
I think if you looked at the bell curve you would see a couple of deviations (where the bell was not as shiny).
 

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I’m not a repair technician but I’ve read that the biggest concern with a relaq for someone who is buying it to play is the quality and care taken during the process. If the tone holes were damaged, or too much buffing was done it can cause serious problems adversely affecting playability
 

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Too many variables to give a pat answer, it depends on the current condition of the horn, and especially how skilled the relaq is. In general you're looking at a ~40% devaluation.
 

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I thought it was 3.14? Or maybe I just want a piece of pie....

But really if you're just protecting a horn and you're gonna play the heck out of it, doesn't matter. If you're trying to make some money flipping it, don't do it.
 
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