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Discussion Starter #1
I recently switched to a new mpc brand on both alto and tenor, and am settling in on these new pieces. As a long time player of a different maker’s mpcs, I’m finding it quite interesting how used to the old facing curves and blowing resistance of the old pieces I had become. This has all been positive change, though. It’s made me realize how entrenched you can become playing a mpc, even if you are making accommodations with your embouchure to adapt to the mpc. Discovering little things like how much or little beak to take in on the new pieces has been really eye opening, and refreshing. I think the danger in playing one kind of mpc for a long time like I had is you really need time on a new mpc to get away from how you played the old mpc as the new mpc may not respond thx same. Anyhow, curious what others’ experience has been. I’m not one to quickly adapt to a new mpc, I need some time (at least a month) start to figure the new mpc out!
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

Depends on a number of factors including your experience level and how much time you spend practicing.

For me it's a week or so, about 10-15 hours of playing time, for being mostly used to the change. About 2-3 weeks for me to get the intonation super solid.

I haven't changed Tenor or Soprano mouthpieces for 2 and a half years maybe it's less with more experience.

Sent from my LGUS997 using Tapatalk
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

ving, for me the mark of good equipment is that I notice getting better tone, response , intonation, control over weeks of practice. So I would expect that to be your situation. If the piece is what it is when you first play it and never gets better over time thats a red flag for me. There is really alot going on in your mouth if you pay attention to voicing , tongue, emb pressure, etc. I"m trying a piece I haven't played for many years and I'm remembering over time what I used to do to make it work K
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

About ten seconds. That's all it takes to know if I like it or not.
I feel the same way unfortunately. A friend of mine has a FL Double Ring Link tenor mouthpiece he’s thinking about selling. I went to try it yesterday hoping it wouldn’t play well. I put a reed on it, played it and out came the 70’s Brecker sound I love. Absolutely the best one of these I’ve played in a while. Dammit, he heard me play it and now doesn’t want to sell it.
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

I don’t switch mouthpieces often but when I do it’s always to make life easier. I tried in high school to force myself to play a metal Berg because it was ‘better’ but hated every minute of it. After a week I was back on my regular piece. I feel the same about trying new horns.
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

I feel the same way unfortunately. A friend of mine has a FL Double Ring Link tenor mouthpiece he’s thinking about selling. I went to try it yesterday hoping it wouldn’t play well. I put a reed on it, played it and out came the 70’s Brecker sound I love. Absolutely the best one of these I’ve played in a while. Dammit, he heard me play it and now doesn’t want to sell it.
Wait a minute, he was thinking about selling it but when he heard you play it he now doesn't want to sell? What's his problem? He doesn't want you to sound good? Or, he thinks if you can get a great sound of this MP he can as well? That's crazy, he can never get the same sound as you for all the various reasons that need no explanation on this forum. He sounds more like an acquaintance than a friend.
 

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Wait a minute, he was thinking about selling it but when he heard you play it he now doesn't want to sell? What's his problem? He doesn't want you to sound good? Or, he thinks if you can get a great sound of this MP he can as well? That's crazy, he can never get the same sound as you for all the various reasons that need no explanation on this forum. He sounds more like an acquaintance than a friend.
2nd choice
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

I know right away as well if it’s something I want to play, but I’m talking about really learning the nuance of a mpc...
 

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if the piece is a different design, 3-6 months...
 

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About an hour. A few extra minutes if I need to tweak a reed.
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

Wait a minute, he was thinking about selling it but when he heard you play it he now doesn't want to sell? What's his problem? He doesn't want you to sound good? Or, he thinks if you can get a great sound of this MP he can as well? That's crazy, he can never get the same sound as you for all the various reasons that need no explanation on this forum. He sounds more like an acquaintance than a friend.
He is more of an acquaintance than a friend. I’ve heard him play and he gets a good sound but he doesn’t play that particular mouthpiece.
I sound the same or better, maybe brighter which I like, on the Link I play so it’s not a big deal. I just want the mouthpiece.
Can you blame me? It’s only the second Double Ring I’ve played that played that well. Completely original which you almost never see.
 

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Re: How long do it take YOU to adjust to a new mpc?

About ten seconds. That's all it takes to know if I like it or not.
+1 I even take out a mouth piece months, or years later and give it another try - same - it's either a keeper...or not...
 

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To play it with a decent sound only a few minutes.

To really learn the ins and outs of a mouthpiece probably a few months.
I think you can figure out if the mouthpiece is better for you within a few minutes......however, I think mrpeebee has nailed it...to get the most out of a mouthpiece, you need at least a month, if not more.

1) Takes time to figure out the subtleties of nailing intonation throughs the entire range of the mouthpiece.
2) Every mouthpiece I have ever tried requires a different embouchure to nail articulations.
2) Takes time to figure out exactly how to position the ligature for your best sound.
3) Takes time to figure out if the reed that matched your old mouthpiece is really the correct reed for your new mouthpiece.
 

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For me, once I have the right reed strength in there, I can usually tell if it's something worth exploring more within about the first minute.

Really getting to know its tendencies takes a lot longer though. For example, I played a link for years that tended to get a little sharp and shrill in the palm keys unless I dropped my jaw a little and voiced extra "fat". Switching to the Robusto I've been on for a little while now, I knew it was solid within the first 10 minutes, but I initially thought the palm keys were a little flat and surprisingly dark. Turns out I was just making the compensation that had become automatic on the Link. Once I kept my embouchure pressure and voicing more neutral, it was fine. Better than fine.

So yeah, I think you can have a sense of whether or not a mouthpiece is in the right ballpark pretty much immediately, but you still need to spend a little bit more time to see if its tendencies are compatible with yours.
 

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I think you can figure out if the mouthpiece is better for you within a few minutes......however, I think mrpeebee has nailed it...to get the most out of a mouthpiece, you need at least a month, if not more.

1) Takes time to figure out the subtleties of nailing intonation throughs the entire range of the mouthpiece.
2) Every mouthpiece I have ever tried requires a different embouchure to nail articulations.
2) Takes time to figure out exactly how to position the ligature for your best sound.
3) Takes time to figure out if the reed that matched your old mouthpiece is really the correct reed for your new mouthpiece.
Thanks. :)

An additional point for me is learning how a new mouthpiece acts in different playing circumstances. Something that sounds great in the practice room can not be good enough at a (loud) gig or rehearsal with a band.
 

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It usually takes me about a month.. I don't like switching mouthpieces often. My current tenor pieces replaced a piece I played on for 5 years, and I agree with the OP in regards to becoming "entrenched" on mouthpieces...when I tried the new pieces, it was amazing how superior they were to the old piece...i had just become accustomed to the old piece even though it felt like junk compared to the new one.

In about a month of playing, I even questioned why I played the original piece at all. Time gives perspective and lets you explore all the possibilities IMO.

- Saxaholic
 
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