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I have a couple of mouthpieces - one by David Jarie and one by Bill Street - that have lost the white color of the makers signature. This is ok of course - it only takes a bit of the terroir out of the sound. But I would prefer to re-white their names, and wonder how to do it. Is it a colored wax?
 

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I have a couple of mouthpieces - one by David Jarie and one by Bill Street - that have lost the white color of the makers signature. This is ok of course - it only takes a bit of the terroir out of the sound. But I would prefer to re-white their names, and wonder how to do it. Is it a colored wax?
My local craft stores sell Sharpie paint pens and regular white Sharpie permanent markers. I've re-gilded clarinet logos with the gold ones. The re-dos don't last forever with a lot of handling.
 

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Well, the originals don't last forever, either. Do the makers use Sharpies? That seems too easy - mark and then sand away outside the engraved name. But if you have to sand after, you wouldn't want to redo them, or only very rarely.
 

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You don't sand. You slop the white on then wipe it off, leaving it in the writing. The old 'white-out' stuff is great for this. you could also use a colored or gold-silver writing pen but you probably still have to wipe it off.
 

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Here's what I use to re-gild clarinets and plastic/HR mouthpieces. Clean out the old "gunk" in the logos with a very small needle spring (or plain old needle), but be VERY careful to ONLY clean out the stamp/logo. Any scratches made by the needle will obviously be filled in with the oil pastel crayon when you apply and you'll have to do some post clean up. To apply, you need to be fairly aggressive and literally "color in" the area. When done, use a piece of paper towel (multiple pieces actually) to remove the access. These work incredibly well. I'm in no way affiliated with this company...
https://www.jerrysartarama.com/caran-dache-neocolor-ii-crayons

Here's a re-gild of one of my personal horns currently on my bench. This color is Silver-Gray btw....

View attachment 234838

John
 

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On mouthpieces, I use acrylic paint - available in a rainbow of colors at your favorite craft store.
 

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Jgreiner, that looks really good. I’ve used regular kids crayons and colored pencils for the same type of job. I found if you get high-grade colored pencils (made for artists), then soften the tip with some alcohol. The hardness is somewhere between crayon and pencil making it easy to “draw“ into the logos. Then afterwords use paper towels or microfiber cloth to remove everything except the pigment in the logos.
 

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On mouthpieces, I use acrylic paint - available in a rainbow of colors at your favorite craft store.
G, You told me once but I forgot. Do you just slop it on and then wipe the raised area clean or do you paint the letters really carefully. I still love the way you painted those Lambersons.......
 

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G, You told me once but I forgot. Do you just slop it on and then wipe the raised area clean or do you paint the letters really carefully. I still love the way you painted those Lambersons.......
Thank you, Steve.

I paint it on, taking care to fill the crevices and corners, wait a minute, then wipe it off. I polish the barrel the next day for a final finish touch.

BTW, I select the color for each mouthpiece to reflect its character.

Be well,

George
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for these answers. I have tried both the acrylic paint and the pastels, and both work beautifully. The maker's signatures in both cases are not very deep - these are signed with an engraver I think. But now they both are freshened up and are no longer lost in darkness.

The markers didn't work as well for me - perhaps the lines were not deep enough. Now we will see which has better adhesion to rubber over time - acrylic or the little bit of linseed oil in the pastels.
 

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Caution: I once used gold Rub N’ Buff on my wood Leblanc clarinet barrel. It brought out the logo but also filled in low spots in the wood grain. I used a solvent to clean up the undesired fill areas.
 

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We used a high quality gold or white crayon and then wiped off the residue at a place I used to work at. At no charge also.
 
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