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How do you think about modulating chord progressions when practicing them in all keys? For example the A Section Of Woody n‘ you:

A-7b5 l D7alt l G-7b5 l C7alt
F-7b5 l Bb7alt l EbMaj7 l EbMaj7

Do you think:
bV-7b5 l VII7alt l III7b5 l VI7alt
II-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or:
(Start 3 above tonic)
ii-7b5 l V7alt l (modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt
(modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or something completely different?
 

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With the caveat that in order to improvise well I prefer to internalize it to the point I don't have to think about the chords too much (just KNOW and 'hear' them), I would tend to think or analyze the changes you posted above the first way you stated, within the key center: III-VI-II-V, etc. The reason being that the tune basically stays in Eb major (I think; correct me if I'm wrong about that). However if there was a true modulation to different key centers, I'd think of it the second way (a series of II-Vs).

But either way is fine as long as you get to the end result of being able to play effectively over the changes. And now the more I think about it, I'd have to say for the purpose of analysis, both ways!
 

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I agree with JL. And I improvise over the melody and use my ears. Have you ever checked how many different chord progressions there are for a melody ? Chords are for piano players, guitarists and, maybe, bass players. But I am old and maybe old-fashioned.
 

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Theory = a supposition or a system of ideas intended to explain something, especially one based on general principles independent of the thing to be explained.

At first it's best to learn theoretically so you can understand all things musical. But at some point we must free our mind so we can just play what we feel. Logical improvisation is based on using good theory. Which ever way we approach using the theory is good as long as it logical. I use both...sometimes I may think about the chords and sometimes I hear more melodic ideas coming from what I'm feeling at the moment. I try not to use the same formulas based on what's logical. In the beginning that's a good thing to know, but after awhile your solos might get repetitive using the same theoretic approach unless you learn all possible substitutions. When we use our ear and feelings...we're playing possible substitutions. Those substitutions usually are using some form of musical logic that we've learned that now just flow freely without overthinking it. That's why you hear advanced players say "Trust your ear". But you must learn logically first. So both ways you have shown are used for many players. I now have developed a way to hear jazz as an actual language that helps make musical sense of many jazz phrases used in music without having to overthink it. I focus on getting the sound of Licks and Phrases in the ear with words that are easily remembered giving the music thoughtful meaning.
 

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I think of:

II V/III, II V/II,
IImdV/I, I


How do you think about modulating chord progressions when practicing them in all keys? For example the A Section Of Woody n‘ you:

A-7b5 l D7alt l G-7b5 l C7alt
F-7b5 l Bb7alt l EbMaj7 l EbMaj7

Do you think:
bV-7b5 l VII7alt l III7b5 l VI7alt
II-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or:
(Start 3 above tonic)
ii-7b5 l V7alt l (modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt
(modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or something completely different?
 

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How do you think about modulating chord progressions when practicing them in all keys? For example the A Section Of Woody n‘ you:

A-7b5 l D7alt l G-7b5 l C7alt
F-7b5 l Bb7alt l EbMaj7 l EbMaj7

Do you think:
bV-7b5 l VII7alt l III7b5 l VI7alt
II-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or:
(Start 3 above tonic)
ii-7b5 l V7alt l (modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt
(modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or something completely different?
I would just think it is a series of minor ii-Vs that starts on the tritone and goes down in whole steps until you get to the root of Eb. To me that is the easiest way to think of it.........
 

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I would just think it is a series of minor ii-Vs that starts on the tritone and goes down in whole steps until you get to the root of Eb. To me that is the easiest way to think of it.........
 

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How do you think about modulating chord progressions when practicing them in all keys? For example the A Section Of Woody n‘ you:

A-7b5 l D7alt l G-7b5 l C7alt
F-7b5 l Bb7alt l EbMaj7 l EbMaj7

Do you think:
bV-7b5 l VII7alt l III7b5 l VI7alt
II-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or:
(Start 3 above tonic)
ii-7b5 l V7alt l (modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt
(modulate down 2) ii-7b5 l V7alt l Imaj7

Or something completely different?
It's a good question, I think mostly I would be thinking both a once. To use a more simple example:

If we're playing:

Em7b5 A7alt Dm7 G7 Cmaj7. I'd be thinking of the Em7b5 A7 as being the ii V in Dminor AND thinking of the E as being the third of C simultaneously. Does that make sense?!


I would just think it is a series of minor ii-Vs that starts on the tritone and goes down in whole steps until you get to the root of Eb. To me that is the easiest way to think of it.........
yeh, me too.

Also, #iv / VII7 / iii / VI7 / ii / V / I

Is a very common movement (i.e. preceding the ii VI ii V I with a minor two five into chord three.). Only interesting thing is here they're all minor ii V's.
 

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If you think of them as minor ii V's descending doesn't that help kind of conjure up more interesting scale or melodic possibilities?
 
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