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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A soprano that I bought as a fixer-upper has a slight bend in the body tubing. I know it is possible to get that fixed, but this one has a permanent neck. The only thing I can think is to disconnect the body tube from toe bow and straighten it that way, but I'm wondering if there is a tool that exists to straighten it through the neck. Here are some pics. It is kind of hard to see the bend, but it looks like the bend starts slightly below the palm keys. Also you can see what the neck looks like in the pics. Here is the link: http://picasaweb.google.com/jpy4610/UntitledAlbumSOP1
 

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First remove relevant keys, so posts are not forced apart.

Put the convex side of the bent area over the underside of your knee cap, or your (strong) belly, and pull the tube straight. Or put it over your thigh and push it straight. They usually bend quite easily. Do it in a very controlled manner, or it will suddenly bend the other way, and very likely crease!

Alternatively, remove the bow and put the body over a snug wooden mandrel (turned for the purpose and held in a vice) that enters as far as the bend, and then pull the rest around with your hands.

Then re-align posts that were displaced during the original bend, by carefully forcing them, and being ready to re-solder them if necessary.
 

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This post got me thinking about made to measure mandrels. It will be obvious from the rest of the post, but I have no repair experience or inclination.

A very effective splint for a fracture that ambulance crews use (and this gets relevant in a minute) involves placing the broken limb on a soft cushion of small polystyrene balls and once the limb molds to the cushion, a vacuum is applied to the cushion that makes it totally solid.

Applying that to the sax?

So, for example in a soprano, if a plastic cylinder was put in the body (such as one used for putting a rolled up poster in), then filled with small polystyrene balls, the bell end tied off, and the neck end taped to suction (hoover) then you would have a solid mandrel, but with just enough give to have a real go at straightening a bend with very little risk of creasing the tube.

Theory has NOT been tested

I won't contact the patent office yet, though, nor give up the day job........
 

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Chris J said:
A very effective splint for a fracture that ambulance crews use (and this gets relevant in a minute) involves placing the broken limb on a soft cushion of small polystyrene balls and once the limb molds to the cushion, a vacuum is applied to the cushion that makes it totally solid.
Chris,
funny you should mention that - I was daydreaming about the opposite - a bike [tyre] tube, inserted and cautiously inflated. (You'd need to cut and close suiteable lengths on either side of the valve; if you just fold the tube you'll end up with an oval sax...). In surgery this is called a stent, but I doubt they have the sizes required for wind instrument repair...
 

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Ben

So you have invented the saxoplasty, and I have invented the saxsplint!.....

It would need some pressure to straighten a brass tube - bit more than for an atheromatous plaque.

So maybe we both keep our day jobs....
 
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