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Listen to some music. Play along by ear. Repeat. Doesn't feel good? Change music. Jam along. Repeat. That's it pretty much. I try to make up and repeat little exercises on the fly for troublesome passages, or do long tones that still kinda fit the songs, that kind of stuff. I might progress slowly but having hella good time, haha
 

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I notice that it doesn't mind what i am doing, transcribing, technique, sound...what helps me more is practicing slow and repetitions. It helps absorbing anything, in the ears, memory and fingers.
 

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I'm still in high school but here's my routine:

Warm up with long tones from middle g down and all my major scales
Practice any scales I have been assigned for the week to learn
Practice music that we are playing in concert band and jazz band
Practice etudes from jazz and practice out of selected studies (advanced) For discrict band tryouts.
More long tones and scales
done.
 

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Similar situation to raindog. Once you've got yourself past the awkward stages of not being able to play what you'd like to hear, then you can exercise your musical brain (as well as your fingers) by putting on music that you DON'T know. This is a challenge in listening, understanding, anticipating, and hearing what will work. You leave behind theory, transcribing, reading, and all the rest of the paraphernalia/baggage that tries to make art an academic exercise. You don't want to be "translating" through anything academic when all that's necessary to become a good improviser is to hear the music in your head and have the instrument be your voice. Of course if your goal isn't to improvise, then stay with all the academic stuff and develop a routine with whatever order you think will help you accomplish your goal.
 
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