Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
36,965 Posts
Do you use a tuner and go to every note on the sax one by one (sharps and flats) to watch where your tone is at ?
That's "intonation", not tone. Intonation refers to pitch; tone refers to the character of sound.

And no, don't rely just on a tuner. You need to develop your hearing as well. Play against a reference, and try to match its pitch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,823 Posts
A tuner can tell you only so much. Make recordings of your playing. If you’re brave, play them back.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
491 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's "intonation", not tone. Intonation refers to pitch; tone refers to the character of sound.

And no, don't rely just on a tuner. You need to develop your hearing as well. Play against a reference, and try to match its pitch.
Ok, what I mean for say, if I play the C concert scale should I match my tuner note for note in the green zone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,063 Posts
Ok, what I mean for say, if I play the C concert scale should I match my tuner note for note in the green zone
The answer is no. Do not use a tuner except as a general check to see if your mouthpiece is in about the right spot. To practice intonation, use a drone tone, or if you have a keyboard, play tones on it and match them by ear. When you use a tuner, you are training yourself to match by eye. Which is not useful.

I have a series of downloadable drone tone sequences in SoundCloud: Droneology. There are many others on line. Please stop using the tuner app.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
36,965 Posts
Ok, what I mean for say, if I play the C concert scale should I match my tuner note for note in the green zone
Yes and no - yes, your pitches should be correct, but you should not be watching the tuner.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lukasali and NO SAX

·
Registered
MKVI Alto Berg-95/0
Joined
·
630 Posts
The E in a C major scale is not exactly the same as it is in an E major scale.
Hope that makes Cents. ;)
Two nice machines.
Audio equipment Electronic instrument Electronic component Gas Font
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,127 Posts
The E in a C major scale is not exactly the same as it is in an E major scale.
Hope that makes Cents. ;)
If you play middle C and the G above on an electronic keyboard, hold it with the pedal then play the E between them on your horn (transpose if needed) in tune to your ear then play the keys E your horn note will probably be a little lower. Two different tuning systems. The keys 3rd will have an interference of about 10 bpm, your horn 3rd could vary but probably will be less than the keys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,823 Posts
Listening to two tones or notes in succession, where one is exact and the other is sharp or flat, if they’re within 12 cents of each other I can’t tell the difference. I suspect others can probably tell within 6 cents and a very few maybe can discern it even finer.

But, as @Grumps said, tone is your personal sound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,657 Posts
To the OP - you "may" want to use & watch the tuner when practicing your long tones so you can gauge how consistent they are.
 

·
Registered
1955 Conn 16M + 1973 Bundy 1 alto
Joined
·
244 Posts
I keep a tuner going the entire time I practice and I look at it sometimes to see if a note is in tune. I don't otherwise look at it.

In general, a note has to sound a little flat to me to be in tune, an average of 10-15 cents. This isn't a horn intonation problem, it's a brain-ear intonation problem. My hope is that in-tune will eventually sound right. It's been slow going. A former teacher discouraged me from using drones ... maybe it didn't resolve my inner sharpness.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top