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Discussion Starter #1
I know it's not easy but can be done. I've heard some pros do it (Kenny Garrett for example).
Any tips, experiences and insights would be appreciated.
Thanks!
 

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Usually a large chamber mouthpiece (Otto Link Master Link, etc...) plus a really hard reed works well.

I used to have a Florida STM 10 that sounded like a husky tenor when I used Rico Orange Box 3s. Great sound!

But why would you want to sound like a tenor on alto? Just get a tenor! Alto is supposed to have its own unique character, in my opinion!
 

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I agree with ThunderWhale, but try putting a tenor reed on your alto mouthpiece. It's different. Not the same thing as a tenor, but it's something to try...
 

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Kenny Garrett doesn't sound like a tenor player, but he does have a very deep rich sound... he uses a Selmer soloist, one of the most alto-y mouthpieces out there. It really comes from playing alto for years and years and working on your sound all of that time. Get crackin' :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ThunderWhale said:
Usually a large chamber mouthpiece (Otto Link Master Link, etc...) plus a really hard reed works well.

I used to have a Florida STM 10 that sounded like a husky tenor when I used Rico Orange Box 3s. Great sound!
Sounds good. Thanks!

ThunderWhale said:
But why would you want to sound like a tenor on alto? Just get a tenor! Alto is supposed to have its own unique character, in my opinion!
1. Mostly because I don't have the dollars for a tenor right now.
2. It's also lighter.
3. Our choir has too few men's voices. I'm think a more tenorish sound on my alto might help. Not sure if it will work though but may be worth trying.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
sambeaux said:
I agree with ThunderWhale, but try putting a tenor reed on your alto mouthpiece. It's different. Not the same thing as a tenor, but it's something to try...
Thanks. If I can get close enough to a tenor sound that would be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
saxymanzach said:
Sell it and buy a tenor.
Then I won't have an alto when I need it.:cry:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Razzy said:
Kenny Garrett doesn't sound like a tenor player, but he does have a very deep rich sound... he uses a Selmer soloist, one of the most alto-y mouthpieces out there. It really comes from playing alto for years and years and working on your sound all of that time. Get crackin' :)
You said it.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Swingin' Cat said:
Combine the two ideas: use an open, large chambered mpc and a tenor reed.
This might work. Thanks.
 

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Listen to a lot of tenor and try to get that sound when you play alto.

Jackie McLean said that's how he got his sound - trying to make his alto sound like a tenor.

[Edit] Oh, if you really want to buy something, Mojobari modifies a Meyer by opening the tip, scooping out the sidewalls and putting in a baffle in order to help with this objective. He's got a post here somewhere where he discusses it if you feel like doing some searching.
 

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lol...

if you want to sound like a tenor just buy one!...

for some reason you have a family of saxs....

regards from Portugal
 

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Chitown is right. Listen to a lot of tenor and try to emulate that sound. Transcribe tenor solos on your alto and play along with the recordings.
 

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Tenors just don't sound like altos. OK-maybe for a note or two! The TIMBRE is different. If you play a concert C on alto,(A),and on tenor,(D), they must sound different! If you mean a TENOR-LIKE sound, you have to remember tenor sax players,(from one to another), don't sound the same at all! Coleman Hawkins, John Coltrane, and King Curtis, don't sound alike AT ALL! I don't EVER remember thinking ANY alto player sounding like a tenor.
 

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Listen to Earl Bostic! He was said to use a tenor reed, and I know for sure he did all his great early stuff on a 'The Martin Alto'.
 

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To avoid posting a whole new topic, I'll expand on this one:

A friend wants me to learn some saxophone parts from songs he's learning on guitar, but many of these songs (Dire Straits - Your Latest Trick for example) feature a tenorist. Beyond just sounding somewhat close to a tenorist, is it even worth trying to blend into the style of the music with an alto? I'll probably try anyway, but I'm curious to know what to expect.
 

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Dunno. Just try playing with the style, and try to emulate the sound that the featured tenor plays. Saxophones are extremely versatilve instruments. I'm sure you'll be able to work out a comprimise if anything.
 

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I saw that the OP mentioned that he wanted to sound like a tenor on alto, and mentioned Kenny Garrett as an example. To me, Kenny sounds like an alto. My tone is actually very similar, though I like my tone better (I've worked pretty hard on my sound) Some tricks that Kenny uses are actually much like the tricks Brecker used.

For instance, he uses Low C B Bb fingerings for the mid range equivalents. He even uses this trick up through C#, D, Eb, at times. In other words he will leave out the octave key on these notes.

Otherwise, it is a personal thing. You must shed your tone to your satisfaction. I know It has taken me nearly 6 years of persistent study to get where I have been wanting to be, but I got there, and I still practice a lot to stay there, and keep evolving as a player.

The truth is, you've gotta put in the time man.
 
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